Author Archives: Sarah Skerik

What is PR & How Does it Relate to Marketing & Social?

What is PR?  This question cropped up on a webinar last week, and it got me thinking.

Traditionally PR has been about managing public opinion; however the organization one represents defines their various publics.   It starts with building awareness, and then through the deployment of messaging or experiences, the emotional responses are elicited, opinions are shaped and reputations formed. At that point, one can start measuring the ensuing actions of the audience, whether those outcomes are measured in terms of votes or purchases or some other behavior.

new school cover

This free ebook offers a slew of new press release tactics designed to win more attention for your messages.

At its core, PR today hasn’t changed – it’s still about influencing opinion and behavior.  However, the mechanisms for building awareness and influencing opinions have changed dramatically.lil tweet

So as I think about what PR is today, I find my answer is multifaceted.

PR is mutable.  It’s changing and changing again, and then yet again.  The tactics have to keep pace with the audience, and audiences are fragmenting and coming together again on a variety of digital channels.  It’s imperative that PR pros understand and embrace the channels where their audiences live.

PR is measurable.  It’s time to bury vague numbers like ad equivalency values and impressions, and start quantifying the top line impact of PR.  This means measuring outcomes, not output. The good news is that digital channels and media are spectacularly measurable.  Awareness can be gauged by volumes of conversation sparked by the content we produce and the media we earn.  Ensuing interaction can be tracked with social data and web site referral information.  Outcomes can be counted and correlated directly to PR activities.

PR is multifaceted.  The conversations we spark and content we publish can earn media, generate social proof and influence search rank.  The results of these outcomes are larger, better qualified and well engaged audiences.  Influentials can be found anywhere – in discussion groups, curating social content, authoring blogs, hanging out on forums and (of course) writing for media outlets.   Developing messaging and content to target and serve the array of influencers and their respective audiences is the purview of today’s PR pro.

It’s multimedia, multi-channel, multi-platform.  It’s difficult to win attention for a message without a visual.  Facebook gives a visibility edge to posts that include multiple visuals.  Entire social networks like Pinterest, Instagram and YouTube (which is also the second largest search engine in the world) are built on visual content.  In addition to garnering attention, good digital content can develop a long life span and continue to accrue audience long after it’s issued.  PR pros need to be thinking visually, and building message and content strategies to reach audiences on different channels with the media mix that’s right for each.

PR is everywhere.   Audiences see our brands and organizations through the internet lens.  Online reviews, social interactions and third party blog posts roll up into reputation and are part of the PR equation.  The reality is this: public relations isn’t just the domain of the communications department anymore. Integration across departments is crucial, as many efforts, such as social campaigns or market research, may be initiated in Marketing or a community team that may not be fully aware of the opportunity to earn additional media and social proof their content.  PR needs to be aware of all outbound communications, not for purposes of message control but for message amplification.

So there’s my answer to the question, “What is PR?”  I’m curious to know whether or not you agree.  Please weigh in with a comment!

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the ebooks Driving Content Discovery and  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

3 Ways News Content is Evolving

PRN Pulse_MEDIA-ContentEvolution_Jan2014-hires

Digital and social media are changing more than how and when we view news – they’re changing the very nature of the news we consume as well, suggests an informal poll of media professionals we fielded via LinkedIn and Twitter.

Most notably, fully half of respondents indicated that trending topics may get more news play than the actual story warrants, as media organizations vie for valuable online audience share.    You see evidence of this phenomenon everywhere you look – Pharrell’s hat’s Twitter presence is making headlines in venerable outlets, as are the leaked Super Bowl commercials. Think about that for a second if you will: major news outlets are covering television commercials.

In addition to subject matter, the digital media environment is forcing outlets to up the ante in terms of content format.  Forty-two percent of of respondents indicated that their outlets are using more content formats than ever.

PR and content marketing pros can use these trends to their advantage a few different ways, such as:

  • Using social popularity of content to win news coverage for content that you may not have considered newsworthy a few years ago.   If you think something is interesting, pitch it.lil tweet
  • Make everything shareable. Don’t forget that journalists and bloggers have to feed their outlets’ social accounts.  Any time you craft a pitch, be sure to include a links the journalist can share.  Failure to do so will eliminate your chances of their sharing your content, thus diminishing your opportunity to build social proof for your story.
  • Visuals. Publishing visuals today is easy and cheap.  Provide newsworthy, compelling visuals  with all messaging.

Want some more ideas and inspiration?  Join us for a free webinar on press release tactics next month!

FREE WEBINAR: Tactics for Maximizing the Results of Your Press Releases 

Press releases have the potential to yield enormous benefits for an organization, including building online visibility and driving long-term brand exposure in addition to securing media coverage. But in order to obtain these results, the news release your organization publishes must be engaging, conducive, and inspire social sharing.  Learn how to create press releases that can compete with the best of the web’s content for audience attention on this free webinar.

REGISTER 

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the ebooks Driving Content Discovery and  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

Whitepaper illustrates the simple difference between traditional IPOs and confidential IPOs

Sarah Skerik:

Our colleagues on the IR side of the house issued a new white paper yesterday. If you are involved (or interested) in the IPO process, this paper will shed some light on a the differences between traditional IPOs and confidential IPOs.

Originally posted on Building Shareholder Confidence:

Click the image to download the whitepaper

Click the image to download the whitepaper

When Twitter announced their confidential IPO last year, many pundits took this as a negative move. “Something is up over there…” Bah. As blogged here, the word “cautious” is a better word to describe the motives of the confidential IPO process.

What is a confidential IPO? The JOBS Act allows firms with less than $1 billion in annual revenue (emerging-growth companies or EGCs) to keep their IPO filings confidential up until just three weeks before they roadshow and market their shares. This is in contrast to the typical S-1 file which is openly filed months before the roadshow giving potential investors, media, peers and competitors a longer time window to consider an investment.

So the questions are… what are investors missing? Is there material information they are not seeing? What is held confidential? What is the SEC doing? Are investors going to…

View original 211 more words

Want More Prospects? New Audiences? Online Visibility? You Need News Releases.

One minutes' worth of tweets of PR Newswire press releases.  Click the image to see the live Twitter feed.

One minutes’ worth of tweets of PR Newswire press releases. Click the image to see the live Twitter feed.  In addition to building audience, social shares of content (including press releases) can benefit search rank.

Does your brand need to acquire more prospects? Does your organization need to reach new potential members or donors?  Are you promoting an event that needs more participants?  Is visibility in search engines important for your organization’s web site? If you answered yes to any of those questions, you might want to consider news releases as part of your communications arsenal.

Here’s why.

Services like PR Newswire reach far beyond newsrooms.  When we distribute your content, it will be seen on hundreds –if not thousands—of web sites that re-post PR Newswire content.    Across the web, those messages build awareness of your message and brand.   But that’s not all they do.

Free Webinar:Press Release Tactics to Maximize Results – Feb 26 

Each of those postings turns your press release into a portal straight back to your organizations web site, providing a mechanism for your organization to capture the interest generated by the press release and turn it into action, such as registering for an event, downloading a white paper, engaging with more related content on your web site, or sharing the content socially.

But here’s the catch.  The content your brand issues  actually has to be interesting and useful to your audiences.  You can’t phone in anything you create for the organization you represent that’s destined to live online, press releases included.  Every scrap of content our brands publish – Tweets, blog posts, videos, web site copy and, yes, press releases – become digital ambassadors for our brands.  They better represent us well.lil tweet  Because in addition to influencing audiences, social signals influence search engines.  Social proof is weighed heavily in the algorithms that determine search rank.

Here are a few tips for writing press releases that will generate awareness among new audiences and ongoing online visibility for your brand.

Write from the audience perspective, not the brand’s. Instead of loading the headline and lead with phrasing such as “XYZ Corp, a leading provider of gobbledy-gook, today announced the unveiling of a new something-or-other …” writers need to lead with information that the audience will value.   The press release needs to be written in the audience’s context – how the announcement will make their lives better, solve their problems or save their companies money.

Include a call to action toward the top of your message.  If you have succeeded in garnering a reader’s attention, capitalize on that immediately by giving them a link to follow that will take them directly to a related page on your web site.  Do not squander interest by making your readers read to the end of the copy, only to find a link to the company’s homepage.

Use news releases do drive discovery of the content your organization publishes.  If you’re using a blog post to provide additional commentary on an unfolding industry development, use a press release to promote that post.   If your organization has invested in the creation of a video or a white paper,  drive online visibility for that new asset and alert more people to its availability by issuing a press release about the content.  The trick to success with this tactic is to include one or two key bits of information in the message.   You have to give the readers a little value to entice them to click over to the full content.

If you’re not convinced of the power of press releases, consider the following:

How one of our customers used press releases to promote his company’s expert sources and generate qualified leads.

Why newswires work: the results of a little experiment I did with press releases in November that (to date) has garnered more than 1,300 new readers to the related blog posts.

How content distribution drives message visibility.

I’m not saying one should choose issuing press releases over other tactics.  Far from it.  A hammer will never replace a screwdriver.  Both are important tools, but both have specific functions.  Communicators today need to be thinking in terms of multi-channel, multi-platform communications.  That means deploying a mix of different messages and across channels and audiences, in order to build maximum relevant exposure for brand content.

Want more examples and ideas? I’m hosting a free webinar on February  26 about press release tactics.  It’s going to be a deep dive into the nitty-gritty of headline writing, press release formatting, ways to keep building reader interest, incorporating calls to action for different audiences, encouraging social interaction…you get the picture.  Here are the details:

FREE WEBINAR: Tactics for Maximizing the Results of Your Press Releases 

Press releases have the potential to yield enormous benefits for an organization, including building online visibility and driving long-term brand exposure in addition to securing media coverage. But in order to obtain these results, the news release your organization publishes must be engaging, conducive, and inspire social sharing.  Learn how to create press releases that can compete with the best of the web’s content for audience attention on this free webinar.

REGISTER 

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the ebooks Driving Content Discovery and  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

Real Time Reactions & Timely Tweets From #Chiberia

I live in the Chicago suburbs, and we’re freezing our tailfeathers off tonight as the polar vortex makes another swing through the Midwest. As I write this post, the temperature is -4 F.  However, the fun is just starting.  We’re going to hit -20 tonight.

At this point, most of us have pretty much had it with the weather, but let’s face it. It is what it is.  Complaining will get you nowhere.   And nowhere is that sentiment evidenced more clearly than on the #chiberia hashtag on Twitter, where local brands and their fans are not hunkering down.   Here are some great examples of timely, topical tweets from local media and brands that are generating positive exposure and conversation on this coldest-of-cold days.

The folks at Crain’s Chicago Business are (wisely) crowd-sourcing photos of the frozen locale, and they’re generating a fantastic (and beautiful) response. 

The team at Today’s Chicago Woman magazine know that many potential readers out there are stuck somewhere, and are offering empathy, and a suggestion to alleviate the boredom:

The Sun-Times is dishing secrets for staying warm from TV reporters – specifically, the intrepid souls who do live traffic spots at 4 a.m. on bridges above expressways:

The intrepid souls at Fleet Feet Chicago aren’t letting the cold deter them from encouraging and interacting with their audience.  Enjoy those runs, folks, wave as you go by.

The folks at LA Valet services are capitalizing in a very timely way by offering their snow-plowing services under the #chiberia hashtag.  It  may not be the most interesting tweet, but given the high winds we’ve been having, coupled the copious snow and frigid temperatures, there are probably more than a few people out there who are ready to seek professional help for snow removal.

The lesson here for brands?  Stay warm, and stay engaged. Follow trending hashtags, gauge the audience spirit and go with it.  The brand tweets I shared are very consistent with the resilient (albeit resigned) tone of the #chiberia tweets.  Spirits are pretty positive.  Heck, we’re even joking about the Cubs. 

Keep on top of hashtags, influencers and social conversations with the Agility platform. You can even research media, build targeted lists and distribute content while you’re at it – it’s easy and fast.  Learn more about Agility here: http://www.prnewswire.com/products-services/agility/ 
Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the ebooks Driving Content Discovery and  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

Content Creation: A New Cornerstone of PR

via SmartInsights

PR is evolving from storytelling to story creating.   As traditional media outlets continue to diversify their news platforms, more opportunities arise each day for brands to tell their stories, shape their images and communicate directly with audiences.  Native advertising, content marketing and social channels that increasingly support (and encourage) visuals and in some cases, longer form content  are all ratcheting up demand for content.

Public relations roles are changing to meet these demands, and PR pros are responding with creative story ideas, creating multi-platform experiences  while also capitalizing on trending topics and yes, breaking news.   Practitioners are taking pages from the content marketing playbook, and are embracing “slow PR” which focuses on building interest over time through interaction with influencers and developing streams of relevant, supporting content.

For many, the challenge isn’t in producing more content, it’s producing more of the right content.   We’re tackling that subject today on our free webinar titled “Newsworthiness: New Context & Opportunities for PR.”

The webinar is free and starts at 1:00 ET.  Register here:  http://budurl.com/Newsy

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the ebooks Driving Content Discovery and  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

 

PR Pros’ Resolutions Map to Top PR Trends [Infographic]

pulse pr resolutions

Using more video in communications and incorporating content marketing or “slow PR” tactics into the mix top the resolutions of the public relations pros who responded to our informal survey last week.     Two perennial challenges – improving PR measurement and better utilization of social channels – are also high on PR’s list of things to do this year.

However, another trend evidenced itself in the write-in responses to the survey.  Numerous respondents noted that they plan on taking a more proactive approach to PR this year, with decided emphasis on ferreting out opportunities for their brands and emphasizing positive stories.

pulse pr resolutions writeins

One respondent managed to encompass numerous tactics in their write-answer, resolving “To reinvigorate pitches, processes, messaging, imagery, cross-platform opportunities, and otherwise bring more fun and new life to clients and projects.”

Not surprisingly, the resolutions map neatly to emerging PR trends – especially broad general agreement among prognosticators about how PR teams are going to be doing less media relations, and more media creation.  Christopher Penn of Shift Communciations summed up this trend in a post about PR trends to watch published last fall:

“As traditional media either evolves or dies, the traditional media relations-only model of PR will evolve or die with it. Public relations work will transform more into earned, owned, and paid media generation, and PR professionals will find themselves increasingly doing work that transcends the traditionally rigid boundaries of earned, owned, or paid media.”

The PR resolutions about video also correlate with a survey PR News and  PR Newswire conducted last year about the use of multimedia in public relations, in which respondents overwhelmingly agreed that in particular that PR doesn’t use enough video (and that they planned to use more video in 2014.)

These survey results and the underlying trends suggest (to me at least) that 2014 will truly be a year of transformation for public relations, offering opportunity for dialed-in communicators to create potent connections with audiences, fueled by excellent content and social interactions.   Do you agree?  What’s at the top of your PR to-do list for 2014?

Need some ideas and inspiration for generating great PR content? I’m hosting a free webinar tomorrow, January 23 on this very topic. Register for Newsworthiness: New Context & Opportunities for PR.
Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of the e-book  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

Content We Love: The Brand as Publisher

ContentWeLoveAs I was interviewing Anthony Hardman  of SecureState for yesterday’s blog post about newsjacking, I asked him whether chip and pin technology that is present in Europe would solve the credit card fraud problems we’ve seen in the US lately.   He replied, “Funny you ask,  I just wrote a 1,000-word blog post on that very topic – I’ll send you the link.”

Credit card security is top of mind for me.  Earlier this week, I spotted some funky looking charges that turned out to be fraudulent.  If, in fact, I accurately represent the audience of people who are concerned about their credit cards after shopping at compromised retailers and are thinking long and hard about credit card security, Hardman did a great job in anticipating my concerns and the sort of questions I’d be asking.  A former journalist, he’s now applying his news nose to his company’s content creation strategy. What he sent me wasn’t just a blog post-it was brand journalism.

secure state chip

As I completed my research for my blog post, I couldn’t help but notice that SecureState had promoted the chip and pin blog post with a news release (“Is Chip and Pin the Answer to Retail Security? SecureState Offers Advice for Industry.”) That news release (and the others SecureState has issued to promote their content recently) is the subject of today’s Content We Love series. 

Now why would anyone use a channel like news release distribution to promote owned media when in fact so many other channels exist? After all, we have our brand websites and blogs, social media channels, industry groups and online forums – the list of channels with which we can reach our audiences goes on an on.

In my mind, the answer is simple. If your organization needs to continually expand its audience and develop engagement with new prospects, then distribution needs to be part of the content strategy. lil tweet

“People are reading news releases, and Google is indexing them. Our second leading source of referral traffic for our web site is from PR Newswire press releases,” Hardman noted during our chat yesterday.  “We’re using them to promote our content. We’re targeting readers.”

Hardman told me that the press releases his organization issued have become the second-largest referrer of traffic to their web site, behind search engines, which means that the readers the company is targeting are finding their messages.

SecureState is using its content strategy to augment its PR efforts, and in effect is acting as a publisher.  The news releases are surfacing the editorial content the company has created.  They’re earning attention and credibility for their own messages by communicating in a timely and direct way with their own audiences.  It’s an interesting and effective strategy for amplifying the visibility of the brand’s messages. 

Get some new ideas for your PR & content strategies for the coming year: join us next week for a free webinar titled “Newsworthiness: New Context & Opportunities for PR,” on January 23.  The very definition of “news” is changing, and this evolution creates the opportunity for PR & content marketing pros to create timely content that earns credibility, earns media and generates ongoing (and relevant) visibility for the brand. Taking pages from the journalistic and content marketing playbooks, this webinar will include a discussion on the evolution of news, how to map the resources within your own organization and ways to identify different opportunities a responsive communications department can capitalize upon.

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the recently-published ebook Driving Content DiscoveryFollow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

5 Tips for Pulling Off a Newsjack with Everyday PR Tools

Orchestrating a successful newsjack (a term coined by David Meerman Scott to describe the practice of responding quickly to a developing situation and inserting your brand’s voice into the ensuing media coverage) can seem daunting, but in reality, all it takes is one person who is paying attention and is willing to get creative with the PR tools they have at hand. lil tweet bird

Anthony Hardman (@ahardman) is a PR specialist with SecureState, a global management consulting firm focused on information security.  Using common PR tools, he orchestrated a spectacular newsjack around the recent security breach at Target. Leveraging the media data base within the Agility platform, along with a raft of finely tuned pitches, creative press releases, his brand’s owned media channels and his telephone, Hardman was able to earn fantastic news coverage through his efforts.

Standing Out

“The first key to earning media attention is determining what you can add to the

SecureState’s Anthony Hardman. The sole PR practitioner at his company, Hardman pulled off an enviable newsjack using common PR tools.

story that no one else is talking about,” noted Hardman, a former television producer who pays particular attention to news value.  “In this case, it was the fact that SecureState could comment on what takes place during a data breach investigation. For other retailers, for example, it could be an example of how they’ve gone above and beyond to ensure their customers’ security.”

Start With Existing Relationships

Newsjacking requires one to work fast, so Hardman started with the journalists he already knew.

“Once I found the news peg and crafted my pitch, I quickly pulled up all my media contacts who I thought would be interested in the story, and started making phone calls,” he told us. “Email is the best way to establish contact initially, but when you have an existing relationship with a reporter, it’s okay to call.”

He called all the producers and reporters he knew, locally and nationally, and within 30 minutes had scheduled two on-site interviews and live in-studio time for a 7 p.m. broadcast that night.

Mine Your Media Database

Things were off to a great start. However, Hardman believed the story would appeal to a broader media audience beyond the core journalists he had already contacted. To develop a broader contact list, he turned to his Agility media database to identify relevant security-industry and national news contacts to whom he could send the pitch.

An email pitch Hardman sent via Agility lead to this interview on PBS NewsHour featuring SecureState's CEO.

An email pitch Hardman sent via Agility lead to this interview on PBS NewsHour featuring SecureState’s CEO.

To save time, Hardman first exported relevant journalist contacts from lists he had created for previous media campaigns.  Then, he decided to cast his net wider, and performed a targeted search for consumer advocate reporters, and added selected contacts from that search to his growing media list. 

“Generally speaking, I prefer to avoid sending out a mass email, in favor of more targeted and personal messages,” Hardman noted. “However, in cases where time is limited, such as a newsjack or when you need to communicate broadly in the event of a crisis, a mass email is appropriate – as long as you are selective about the recipients.”  

To hone in on the right people, Hardman used the Google News search function embedded in Agility. 

“I love the Agility Google search function,” he told us.  “I start by targeting topics within the database, and then whittle the contacts down.  Then I do a quick Google search and look at their latest stories to help decide whether or not they’re a good fit for my pitch.”

“The Google search function is a great way to expand your media research beyond what we provide in the Agility profiles,” explained Torrey Mirabito, PR Newswire’s director of customer engagement, and one of our Agility experts. “If you want to get a real sense for how the journalist is writing and what they’re covering, you have the option to hit the “Search Google” button in Agility, which will pull up the Google News file for that person, enabling you to see their recent work at a glance. “

Hardman's secret weapon - the Agility platform.

Hardman’s secret weapon – the Agility platform.  He used Agility to build targeted media lists, research journalists’ recent writing and distribute his email pitches.

Once he had refined his media lists, Hardman turned his attention to the messages, creating different emails for each outlet type.  For broadcast outlets, Hardman offered experts for on-camera interviews, and included a recent blog post so news producers could get a feel for the point of view the company was offering.  Print outlets received a pitch with a different news peg which highlighted the fact that SecureState is one of 11 companies authorized to investigate card holder data breaches.

Hardman sent out his pitches and kept an eye on the analytics.  Over the course of the following two hours, he secured multiple interviews with a variety of media outlets, including the Los Angeles Times and numerous trade publications.  A follow up email distribution garnered more coverage, including an appearance two days ago on PBS NewsHour for SecureState’s CEO.

Respond to Journalist Queries

There are a variety of services journalists use to post queries and find experts, and Hardman didn’t rest on his laurels. He scanned PR Newswire’s ProfNet and Help a Reporter Out (HARO) during the news cycle around the data breach, and responded to several requests for experts with his unique pitch. 

This ProfNet query from an AP reporter lead to coverage in the Boston Globe, Yahoo! Finance and NPR (and dozens of other outlets across the US.)

This ProfNet query from an AP reporter lead to coverage in the Boston Globe, Yahoo! Finance and NPR (and dozens of other outlets across the US.)

Hardman says he knew he struck gold when Associated Press reporter Bree Fowler – who had issued a query on ProfNet  and was on a tight deadline – instantly responded to his pitch with an interview request.   The resulting story (Tips for Consumers Worried about the Target Breach) hit the AP national wire, and was picked up in media outlets from coast to coast.

Leverage Branded Media

Despite the fact that he was generating extraordinary media coverage, Hardman also capitalized on the opportunity to develop traction for SecureState’s owned media channels. Two internal experts were assigned blog posts to provide additional insight and perspective into the data breach.

“I edited and published the posts, and promoted them through every channel I could, which included social media and a news release promoting the articles,” Hardman told us.

The press releases SecureState has issued to  promote company content are now the second-largest source of web site traffic for the company, behind search engines.

The press releases SecureState has issued to promote company content are now the second-largest source of web site traffic for the company, behind search engines.

“People are reading news releases, and Google is indexing them. Our second leading source of referral traffic for our web site is from PR Newswire press releases,” Hardman noted. “We’re using them to promote our content. We’re targeting readers.”

Press releases, blog posts and media databases are PR industry tools that can deliver spectacular results when wielded with creativity, timeliness and precision, as the results of Hardman’s efforts prove.

“When you’re one person, you have to be agile and you have to use what you have,” Hardman concluded.

Want more inspiration?  Join us for a free webinar titled “Newsworthiness: New Context & Opportunities for PR,” on January 23.  The very definition of “news” is changing, and this evolution creates the opportunity for PR pros to create timely content that earns credibility, earns media and generates ongoing (and relevant) visibility for the brand. Taking pages from the journalistic and content marketing playbooks, this webinar will include a discussion on the evolution of news, how to map the resources within your own organization and ways to identify different opportunities a responsive PR department can capitalize upon.

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the recently-published ebook Driving Content DiscoveryFollow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

What’s Your PR Resolution for 2014? [Survey]

Image via

The new year always brings discussion of what trends and tactics are on tap for the coming twelve months, and this year is no different.    Storytelling, new measurement tactics, hyper-targeting, visuals, social, “Slow PR” — these are just a few of the trends industry prognosticators have identified.

But we’re curious – which strategies and tactics top your PR resolutions for 2014?  Tell us in this short, one-question survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2WCGNH9

And check back next week to see how your answer compares to what your peers said!