MEDIA News: Media Moves at Newsday, Business Insider, Defense One and More…

http://prnbloggers.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/agility-logo.png?w=127&h=125&h=125PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department makes thousands of updates to the  database of journalists and bloggers that underpins our Agility media targeting and distribution platform.  Below is a sampling of recent media moves and news from the research team.  Learn more about Agility media targeting here.

Newsday Newsday (New York, NY): Former @WSJ President Gordon McLeod has been named Publisher @Newsday.

SI KIDS Sports Illustrated for Kids (New York, NY): Mark Bechtel (@SI_MarkBechtel) is the new Managing Editor of @SIKids. He most recently served as a Senior Editor at Sports Illustrated (@SInow).

Business Insider Business Insider (New York, NY): Anthony Weiner (@anthonyweiner) joins @businessinsider as a Political Columnist. His column titled “Weiner!” will appear the last Friday of every month.

Defense One Defense One (Washington, DC): Ben Watson (@iBenwatson) takes the reins as News Editor @DefenseOne.

BuzzFeed BuzzFeed (New York, NY): Former Breaking News Reporter Adrian Carrasquillo (@RealAdrianC) has been promoted to Editor of Latino Coverage @buzzfeed. And Alison Willmore (@AlisonWillmore) will be Buzzfeed’s first Film Critic.

Gawker Gawker (@Gawker) (tips@gawker.com): The new Editor-in-Chief at Gawker is Max Read (@Max_Read).

Los Angeles Times Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA): The Times (@LATimes) names Kimi Yoshino (kimi.yoshino@latimes.com) (@kyoshino) Business Editor.

Degen Pener The Hollywood Reporter (Los Angeles, CA): Culture Editor Degen Pener  (@DegenPener) will serve in the same position with Billboard (@billboard) also.

Mashable Mashable (@Mashable) (news@mashable.com): Ashley Codianni (@AshleyCodianni) will soon be the Director of News Videos at Mashable.

Salon.com Salon.com (@Salon): Laura Bennett (@LBennett) will soon be the new Culture Editor at Salon.

The Verge The Verge (@Verge): Matthew Schnipper (@MattSchnipper) will be the new Managing Editor.

The Daily Beast The Daily Beast (@TheDailyBeast): Malcolm Jones has been promoted to Book Editor at The Daily Beast.

Slate Slate.com (@Slate): The newest contributor for Slate.com is Jamelle Bouie (@JBouie). His focus will be on politics and race.

epicurious Epicurious.com (@Epicurious): Danica Lo (@DanicaLo) is the new Executive Editor at Epicurious.

Chicago Sun-Times Chicago Sun-Times.com (Chicago, IL): Deputy Features Editor Sue Ontiveros (@SueOntiveros) is resigning from the daily (@Suntimes) after 30 years of service. She will continue to serve at the paper by posting a weekly editorial page column about social issues and blogging about nutrition, fitness, wellness and food online on a freelance basis.

Capitol File Mag Capitol File (Washington, DC): Amy Moeller (@amyemoeller) has been hired as an Associate Editor @capitolfilemag.

Billboard Billboard (New York, NY): Frank DiGiacomo (@frankdigiacomo) joins @billboard as a Contributing Editor and Carson Griffith (@CarsonGriffith) joins as a Contributor.

PIX11 WPIX-TV (New York, NY): WPIX-TV (@wpix) launches “PIX11 Investigates”, an investigative news program, featuring Arnold Diaz, Mary Murphy (@MurphyPIX), and Howard Thompson (@PIXHelpMeHoward) as hosts.

Essence Magazine Essence Magazine (New York, NY): Deena Campbell (@DeenaCampbell) is the new Hair and Beauty Editor @essencemag.

domino Domino Magazine (New York, NY): Krissy Tiglias (@krissytiglias) is the new Digital Director @dominomag.

Star Tribune The Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN): Matt Vensel @mattvensel) is joining the paper (@StarTribune) as a Sports Reporter covering the Minnesota Vikings football team. He was most recently with The Baltimore Sun.

Duluth~Superior Mag Duluth-Superior Magazine (Duluth, MN): The monthly lifestyle periodical (@DSMagazine) focused on the Duluth region, has closed down. The magazine had been in print since 2008.

Washington Post The Washington Post (Washington, DC): Scott Allen (@ScottSAllen) joins the Sports Staff as a Reporter/Blogger.

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL): Chicago Blackhawks beat writer Tim Sassone (@TimSassone) recently passed away. Tim covered the Blackhawks and hockey for the last 26 years.

SCVSignal The Signal (Santa Clarita, CA): The Signal (@SCVSignal) promotes Russ Briley to Publisher.

Simi Valley Acorn Simi Valley Acorn (Agoura Hills, CA): The Acorn (@SVAcorn) welcomes Darleen Principe as Editor.

Petoskey News-Review The Petoskey News-Review (Petoskey, MI): Rachel Brougham is the new Assistant Editor @PetoskeyNews.

MEDIAware’s full weekly version can be found at:www.prnewswire.com/knowledge-center/medi…

PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department provides daily updates on Twitter (twitter.com/PRNmedia).

Detailed outlet and contact information is available at agility.prnewswire.com.

5 PR Tactics for Internal Communications

Internal Collaboration
With the proliferation of social media channels, employees have become 24/7 brand ambassadors for their companies and the lines between internal and external communications are continuously blurring. Therefore, employers have as much of a responsibility to engage and inspire their internal staff as they do with external audiences.

The tactics discussed at Business Development Institute’s Internal Communications and Collaboration Leadership Forum closely mirrored the new school PR and marketing tactics that organizations are employing to drive action from their consumers. After all, employees are simultaneously consuming the information they produce and should therefore believe in the same brand promises they make to the public. The following tactics illustrate how you can improve your employee experience using similar tactics used to engage external audiences

Create useful content

Treat the initiatives happening around your company as important breaking news. Editorial content such as blog posts and articles help amplify positive growth around the company and keep teams across the organization informed about the overall mission and business strategy.

Senior leaders as chief communicators

According to a survey conducted by Brilliant Ink, 80% of employees feel more engaged when they receive inspiring communications from senior leaders. Quotes from executive leadership establish trust and humanizes the brand from both an employee and consumer standpoint.

Utilize multimedia 

Video messages and teleconferencing are other ways to humanize the organization by bringing communications to a personal level and are far more engaging than a text only email. Below is a video used by AIG that motivated their employees to “bring on tomorrow.”

Use internal social media with purpose

The social channels used by consumers such as Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn meet different needs of their audiences, and enterprise social channels are no different. Your internal communication channels need a thoughtful strategy behind them to keep people engaged and understand the value of communicating on that space. Ultimately it is best to minimize the number of places that people have to go for communications.

Communicate the value or benefit of an employee’s labor

PR and marketing professionals are ultimately trying to communicate why their product or service is important to consumers. Employees need to feel the same sense of importance when it comes to their work. Research by AIG reports that 70% or more of strategic and change programs fail without effective manager communications. Connecting the dots between daily work and the overall company strategy is vital to maintaining productivity and helping an employee understand where they fit in.

It is widely understood that there is a direct and positive relationship between employee engagement and overall company growth; organizations that invest in creating a more unified work environment experience more productivity and financial growth than those that do not. Plan your internal communications strategies with the same attention and care as you do externally in order to drive inspiration and action from employees.

ShannonShannon Ramlochan is the Content Marketing Coordinator at PR Newswire. Follow her on Twitter @sramloch.

Content We Love: Amplifying Owned Content

ContentWeLove

Click here to download to free ebook "Read It, Watch It, or Tweet It – How Americans Read and Share News"

Click here to download to free ebook “Read It, Watch It, or Tweet It – How Americans Read and Share News”

Today’s buying journey is heavily dependent on discoverability, peer or influencer recommendations, and trust. Attempting to promote the content you’ve worked hard to create by relying solely on owned channels such as your company website or social media accounts can prevent those messages from being discovered beyond the audiences you’ve already acquired.

Think about the people who need your help but are unaware that you are the solution to their problem — how will they find you? Having your message resurface on other trusted industry websites via search engines or mentioned by the media (either in an article, or a tweet) can make all the difference between a gain and loss of audience, prospects and ultimately ROI. Therefore, if your brand has invested resources into creating content, putting some muscle behind the promotion of those messages is imperative.

Today’s featured content from Inkhouse is near and dear to our hearts, in terms of both subject and format.  The firm used a press release titled, “In TV We (Still) Trust: 73 Percent of Americans Cite Television as Their Preferred and Most Trusted News Source – Topping Online, Print and Social Media” to share the findings of a survey they conducted with GMI Research on Americans’ news consumption habits.

This subject remains a hot button issue as the digital age continues to evolve traditional news formats and redefine what is newsworthy, and Inkhouse capitalised fully on the opportunity to make this information discoverable to the journalists, bloggers and other influentials interested in the topic, using creative content distribution  to amplify owned content.

INKHOUSE INFOGRAPHICAccording to the survey, Americans are consuming news in a variety of different ways but rely on certain channels more than others. Press releases are cited as the most trusted source of company generated news, more than blog posts or articles by the CEO and advertisements.

Audiences are particularly wary of being fed corporate propaganda, but press releases – which are on-record statements and disclosures –  are viewed as credible sources of news and information by public audiences.

Obviously, we’re interested in the subject matter and love the fact that press releases were found to be viewed so favorably by the public.  Content aside, however, the message shines for a number of other reasons:

  • An intriguing headline that includes a stat commands the reader’s attention and is almost perfectly tweet-able;
  • An infographic is included as a visual asset to fuel engagement and social sharing.  It beautifully illustrates the main findings of the survey in a concise format to help the reader process this information quickly;
  • A quote from Beth Monaghan, co-founder and principal of InkHouse promotes the company’s thought leadership and brings a human element to the brand message;
  • Tight bullet points neatly summarize other key findings from the survey for the readers who are quickly scanning the page for information most pertinent to them
  • Finally, a call-to-action that drives traffic back to the company website,  generating ROI.

This press release is a brilliant example of utilizing distribution in a creative way that reflects the convergence of marketing and PR. Kudos to Inkhouse on an A+ press release!

ShannonAuthor Shannon Ramlochan is PR Newswire’s Content Marketing Coordinator. Follow her on Twitter @sramloch.

 

The Media Evolution and Its Impact on PR

panelists

Media Evolution Panelists Ellyn Angelotti, Theodore Kim, and David Cohn

Newsrooms traditionally reached their audience through one channel and measured a story’s success by its impact on the local community.

However, that’s all changed, said Ellyn Angelotti, Director of Custom Programs at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies.

Audiences now access a media outlet through multiple channels. In addition to traditional print and broadcasting, newsrooms maintain desktop and mobile sites, tablet apps, blogs, and social media.

Did you miss the webinar? Here’s the link to the on-demand version: The Media Evolution Webinar

The community has diversified and impact is measured on a greater scale.

Angelotti, who also teaches social media and law at Poynter, was joined by Circa News Director David Cohn, Washington Post Mobile/Tablet Editor Theodore Kim, and moderator Sarah Skerik for a discussion on how newsrooms are adapting to the ever-changing media environment.

At the Washington Post, Kim said, evaluating a story’s success depends on the individual piece. While the publication’s ultimate goal is to effect positive change in government and society, the Post offers news sections and 30+ blogs on a variety of topics. An entertainment or sports story may be guided by different metrics.

Each section looks beyond universal metrics to discover how specific engagement is influenced by human production.  The Post may examine a story’s clickthroughs to determine whether there is something in the user experience, headline, or story arc that worked well and can be replicated or improved upon.

Kim clarified, though, that it’s important to remember every newsroom – from the Huffington Post and New York Times to the Dallas Morning News – has different revenue strategies and ways it views its audience.

For instance, whereas news is commonly thought of as a one way stream, Cohn said Circa looks at it as a back-and-forth relationship between the outlet and audience.

The mobile news app measures success based on a unique metric. When a reader is on the app, they can “follow” a story that interests them. The next time someone visits the app, Cohn’s team delivers quick updates based on what’s changed since that individual’s last visit.

Keeping track of what readers consume allows the app to customize the best possible experience and build a relationship over time.

Metrics’ Impact on Journalists and Newsrooms

Although a journalist may be more focused on serving their audience than forecasting metrics, it’s clear that metrics have had an impact on storytelling and the role of journalists over time.

One of these changes is a breakdown in the inverted pyramid structure. Kim cited the popularity of the Post’s 9 Questions About Syria You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask and how it bridged the gap between old and new storytelling.

On the one hand, the story fit the traditional role of the media by educating its audience on the intricacies of an important and complex topic. However, its execution took a new approach. The headline was written to be very shareable on social media and the story format broke the issue down into 9 bite-size items of substance.

Circa, similarly, has found success by organizing its stories into atomic units: facts, quotes, statistics, events, and images. These “snackable” formats are gaining popularity because audiences want to get to the point quickly.

Metrics also come into play when determining which stories are published.

Newsworthiness used to be decided by editors and publishers, said Angelotti. But more often, we’re seeing it defined by what a newsroom’s social networks and online audience are talking about.

Kim agreed, with a caveat. If everyone is talking about something on social media, a news organization should pay attention to it; however, it may not necessarily be newsworthy.

We have to keep in mind that the number of active social media users is a fraction of the world population, he said.  When something is being talked about on Twitter, the tendency is to think that everyone is talking about it. That’s not always the case.

Because of this, most journalists use every tool that’s out there: They’ll have multiple columns up in Tweetdeck while filtering through incoming email and keeping an eye on Google News alerts, saved searches, and the newsroom’s other notification systems.

As Angelotti succinctly put it: “Journalists have gone from just being storytellers to sensemakers.”

It’s a journalist’s responsibility to sort through the glut of information, verify it, add context, and give the audience the resources to think critically.

How can PR help, not hurt this newsgathering process?

Kim estimated that he receives 600-700 emails a day. Conservatively, 10 of those emails are relevant pitches for stories.

To improve your pitch’s chance of cutting through the other emails, it’s important to understand a journalist’s audience. Journalists develop a niche and expertise. They know and understand who their audience is and how to serve them. “If your pitch can sync to that, all the better,” said Cohn. “If it’s out of left field, it’s like finger nails on chalk board.”

Angelotti said that a pitch is more compelling if you go beyond the boilerplate information, and tell a story. A good journalist will take that as a first step and push it further. They may not use your version of the story, but the process you undergo to research and craft your brand’s narrative surfaces valuable insight.

The same goes for multimedia, said Kim. Although it’s helpful to have images and video available, many reporters will not use your video package in its entirety. It’s important to make your materials editable and easy to break apart.

The panelists agreed that the best way to get your story heard is by building a relationship with the journalist. “Ask yourself: How many times have you engaged with a reporter on Twitter? Have you retweeted and read their stuff?” suggested Kim.

One thing is clear: While journalism and public relations are constantly in flux, thorough and thoughtful relationship building isn’t going anywhere.

Want to learn more about the issues and trends affecting journalists and bloggers? Subscribe to PR Newswire’s new Beyond Bylines blog to stay up to date with the media industry.

As a media relations manager at PR Newswire, Amanda Hicken enjoys helping journalists and bloggers customize the news they receive on PR Newswire for Journalists. Follow her at @PRNewswire and @ADHicken.

PR is 80% more effective than content marketing.

Source: InPowered & Neilsen

Source: InPowered & Nielsen

According to a recent study sponsored by InPowered and conducted by Nielsen, content marketing is 88% less effective than public relations, due in large part to the outsize influence earned media wields over the public.    According to the study, earned media – defined as content created by credible third party experts – consistently provided more benefit to brands than did user generated or branded content.

Credibility is the key

The stat is interesting for all sorts of reasons, not the least of which is the simple fact that marketers are very good at measuring outcomes, something that PR has continued struggle with. The fact that Nielsen has identified the potent effect of credible third-party mentions has upon potential customers across the various stages of the buying cycle should make PR measurement mavens sit up and take note.

With all the conversation about, investment in and discussion of content marketing over the last few years, one has to wonder exactly what makes PR efforts so much more valuable in terms of driving business than content marketing campaigns.

The answer is credibility.  It’s devilishly hard to produce branded content that is truly credible.  The content brands publish (even this little blog post!) all have underlying agendas, and sometimes, those agendas aren’t too thinly veiled.

Earned media & influence 

Earned media, on the other hand, is widely perceived as being more credible and authentic.  Therein are the keys to its influence – and that’s where public relations can really shine. PR practitioners understand influence, how it accrues and from where it flows. PR pros understand the subtleties of the story and how to wrap information in context that makes sense to an audience.

It’s little wonder that PR is behind the blockbuster headlines, viral videos and other content that fills our newsfeeds and floats to the top of search engine results.

Marketing tactics PR should steal 

All that said, as a content marketer myself, I do believe that there are opportunities for PR to steal some important tactics from the content marketing toolbox.  Digital marketers test and refine messages continually, and have developed a range of best practices for developing web-based cntent that works, and other communicators can borrow those tactics to improve their own campaigns.

Designing press releases and other content with reader actions in mind is one such recommendation.  Think of it this way: every piece of content your brand issues online- press releases, blog posts, articles, backgrounders, etc. — becomes a web page. That specific web page can be seen in search engines and  shared on social networks. When that page captures the fleeting attention of a visitor, your organization has the opportunity to communicate powerfully and personally with that person. Within that moment, you have their attention and with it, the opportunity to channel their next actions.

Marketers obsess over this opportunity to drive audience action: they test different scenarios and obsessively tweak language and layout to determine what works best. While it’s not reasonable to think that we have the opportunity to send 25 different versions of the same press release to see which generates the best results, we can definitely take some broad best practices from digital markers and apply them to our messages.

Those tactics are detailed in the recent blog post titled “Extreme Makover: Press Release Edition,” and the slide deck embedded above.

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the ebook  New School Press Release TacticsFollow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

Grammar Hammer: Comma Drama

via Grammar Girl

via Grammar Girl

In the thousands of news releases that cross the desks of the PR Newswire Customer Content Services team on a weekly basis, placing commas outside of quotation marks ranks as one of the most commonly made errors. Though misplaced commas are not a major grammatical offense in comparison to some others we’ve seen, its frequency makes this a topic worth exploring.

What’s fascinating about this topic is really how the U.S. grammar rules vary from the British. In the U.S., the comma (or other punctuation) goes inside the quote marks, regardless of logic. I refer you to English Grammar for Dummies, 2nd Edition, which gives a great recap of the scenarios in which this rule applies. On the other hand, British grammar rules focus on the context and want the punctuation placed “logically” versus “conventionally”. (See what I did there?)

For historical context, good old-fashioned typography is the primary reason Americans place punctuation inside their quote marks. According to the Guide to Grammar and Writing, when printing used raised bits of metal, periods and commas were the most delicate keys and writers risked breaking off or denting the face of the piece of type if they had a quotation mark on one side and a blank space on the other. Hence the convention arose of always using periods and commas inside the quote regardless of logic. In today’s digital age, it seems that we could eliminate this rule as easily as the rule of two spaces following a period.

My advice is to pick a style and stick with it. In 99% of my writing, I’ll follow the American rule of tucking my punctuation marks neatly inside the quotation marks, except for that teeny tiny 1% where context or logic necessitates it being outside (and please know that inconsistency makes an editor’s brain hurt).

In other grammar news, the Associated Press announced they were relaxing their stance even further on “more than” vs. “over.” A part of me has died; I just talked about this topic in February. How do you feel about AP’s new position on this rule?

Have a grammar rule you’d like me to explore? Drop me a line at catherine.spicer@prnewswire.com.

Author Catherine Spicer is a manager of customer content services at PR Newswire.

MEDIA News: Media Moves at The Wall Street Journal, ESPN The Magazine,The Atlantic and More…

http://prnbloggers.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/agility-logo.png?w=127&h=125&h=125PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department makes thousands of updates to the  database of journalists and bloggers that underpins our Agility media targeting and distribution platform.  Below is a sampling of recent media moves and news from the research team.  Learn more about Agility media targeting here.

Wall Street Journal The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY): Alistair Barr (@alistairmbarr) has left USA Today to join @WSJ to cover Google’s operations in Silicon Valley. Business Insider (@businessinsider) Reporter Steven Perlberg (@perlberg) moves to The Journal as well beginning the first of April. Erik Holm (@erikholmwsj) is now Deputy Editor of the MoneyBeat blog.

ESPN The Magazine ESPN The Magazine (Bristol, CT): Editor-in-Chief of @ESPNMag Chad Millman (@chadmillman) (chad.x.millman@espn.com) is also now the Editor-in-Chief of ESPN.com (@espn).  In addition, beginning in June, Rick Reilly (@ReillyRick) will end his sports column for the magazine. However he will switch over to do television for the company.

Washington Post The Washington Post (Washington, DC): Ryan McCarthy (@mccarthyryanj) is the new Assistant Business Editor at the Post.

The Atlantic The Atlantic (Washington, DC): David Frum (@davidfrum)(dfrum@theatlantic.com) is the new Senior Editor @TheAtlantic.

The Associated Press Associated Press (New York, NY): Associated Press (@AP) Business Editor Hal Ritter is retiring early next month.

Los Angeles Times Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA): The LA Times (@LATimes) has named Stacey Leasca (@SLeasca)(stacey.leasca@latimes.com) Social Media Editor.

Morning Consult (Washington, DC): Emily Holden (@emilyhholden)(emily@morningconsult.com) has left Roll Call to join Morning Consult as Energy Editor.

Philanthropy Chronicle of Philanthropy (Washington, DC): Former Bloomberg Government Managing Editor Daniel Parks (@itsdanparks) is the new Managing Editor @Philanthropy.

National JournalNational Journal (Washington, D.C.): Emma Roller (@EmmaRoller) (eroller@nationaljournal.com) is now working @NationalJournal as a Politics Blogger. Jason Plautz (@Jason_Plautz) (jplautz@nationaljournal.com) is the new Energy Reporter for the outlet.

The New RepublicThe New Republic (Washington, D.C.) The New Republic (@TNR) has hired Brian Beutler (@BrianBeutler) as a Senior Editor.

Essence Magazine Essence Magazine (New York, NY): Lauren Williams (@LaurnWilliams) (lwilliams@essence.com) is now the News Editor @EssenceMag. Meanwhile, Aretha Busby (@arethabusby) is no longer with the magazine where she served as Beauty Director. In addition, Emil Wilbekin (@EmilWilbekin) is no longer the Editor-at-Large at Essence Online. He has held that position since January 2012.

MORE MagazineMore Magazine (New York, NY): More Magazine (@MoreMag) welcomes Debra Birnbaum (@debrabirnbaum) (debra.birnbaum@meredith.com) as acting Entertainment Editor.

PIX11 WPIX-11 (New York, NY): WPIX-11 (@WPIX) welcomes Andy Adler (@Andy_Adler) (morningnews@wpix.com) to the Morning News team as Entertainment and Sports Reporter. She will start April 7.

Prevention Magazine Prevention Magazine (New York, NY): Emma Haak (@EmmaHaak27) (emma.haak@rodale.com) joins Prevention (@PreventionMag) as Associate Editor.

People magazinePeople Magazine (New York, NY): Henry Goldblatt (@henrygoldblatt) (henry_goldblatt@peoplemag.com) moves from Deputy Editor of Entertainment Weekly (@EW) to Deputy Editor of People (@Peoplemag). Also, Elizabeth Gleick (@BetsyGleick) (elizabeth_gleick@peoplemag.com) moves from Executive Editor to Deputy Editor for Human Interest.

The Weather Channel The Weather Channel (Atlanta, GA): Veteran Meteorologist Dave Schwartz (dschwartz@weather.com) is returning to the air @weatherchannel next month after a number of years away.

Teen Vogue Teen Vogue (New York, NY): Emily Gaynor (@emgaynor) (emily_gaynor@condenast.com ) is the new Assistant Beauty Editor here.

FOX News (New York, NY): Contributor Scott Brown (@SenScottBrown) has left the network to pursue a run for US Senate in New Hampshire.

SI KIDS Sports Illustrated for Kids (New York, NY): Managing Editor Bob Der announced his departure from Sports Illustrated for Kids (@SIKids), a position he held for the past eight years.

TOWN&COUNTRY Town & Country Magazine (New York, NY): Jay McInerney (@JayMcInerney) has joined Town & Country (@TandCmag) as a Monthly Contributor. He will write about wine beginning in the June/July issue.

CNN CNN – New York Bureau (New York, NY): CNN Los Angeles Reporter Miguel Marquez (miguel.marquez@turner.com)  is moving cross country to report for CNN (@cnn) in New York.

NewsHourPBS NewsHour (Arlington, VA): Domenico Montanaro (@DomenicoPBS) will soon be a Political Editor and Senior Producer at PBS NewsHour (@Newshour).

SHAPE magazine Shape Magazine (New York, NY): Cassie Shortsleeve (@CShortsleeve) (cshortsleeve@shape.com) is the new Senior Online Editor for Shape (@Shape_Magazine).

Entertainment Weekly Entertainment Weekly (New York, NY): Stephanie Robbins (@StephRobbins) (stephanie_robbins@ew.com) is the new Web Editor for Entertainment Weekly (@EW). She is based in L.A.

Sunset Magazine Sunset Magazine (Menlo Park, CA): Christine Ryan (ryanc@sunset.com) is now the new Senior Features Editor at Sunset (@SunsetMag).

Chicagoist.com Chicagoist (Chicago, IL): Melissa McEwen (@melissamcewen) has joined @Chicagoist as the Food and Drink Editor. McEwen replaces Anthony Todd (@FoodieAnthony) (anthony@tastingtable.com), who recently joined the Tasting Table (@TastingTable) as Chicago Editor.

KOAA-TV (Colorado Springs, CO): The NBC affiliate has hired Valerie Abati as Meteorologist. Abati was most recently at KSBW-TV in Salinas, CA.

Star Tribune Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN): Patrick Condon (patrick.condon@startribune.com) (@patricktcondon) has joined the Star Tribune (@StarTribune)  as a Reporter, covering Minnesota state politics and government. He was previously at the Associated Press – Minneapolis Bureau.

Mental Floss Mental Floss (Chesterland, OH): Hannah Keyser (@HannahRKeyser) is now writing for Mental Floss Magazine (@Mental_Floss).

theGrio.comtheGrio (@theGrio) (info@thegrio.com): Lilly Workneh (@Lilly_Works) (lillyuga@gmail.com) is now the “Living” Section Editor here.

The Intercept The Intercept (@The_Intercept) (media@firstlook.org): John Cook (@JohnJCook) is joining The Intercept as Editor-in-Chief.

Pursuitist Luxury Pursuitist (@Pursuitist) (pursuitist@gmail.com): McLean Robbins (@DeaconDoesDC) (mclean@mcleanrobbins.com) is now the East Coast Editor.

Yahoo Yahoo! (@Yahoo) (media@yahoo-inc.com): Lisa Belkin (@LisaBelkin) has joined Yahoo! as a Senior National Correspondent.

WCCO - CBS Minnesota WCCO-TV (Minneapolis, MN): Kim Johnson (@KimJohnsonABC4) has been hired as the new Saturday Morning Anchor at the NBC affiliate, starting in May. She comes to WCCO from KTVX-TV in Salt Lake City. Also at the station, Jason Matheson (@jasonmatheson) has been brought on as a Reporter for the evening news.

Roll Call Roll Call (Washington, DC): Senate Reporter Meredith Shiner (@meredithshiner) is no longer @rollcall.

LA Business Journal Los Angeles Business Journal (Los Angeles, CA): Reporter Tom Dotan is no longer with the Los Angeles Business Journal (@LABJcommunity). He covered technology and hospitality.

MEDIAware’s full weekly version can be found at:www.prnewswire.com/knowledge-center/medi…

PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department provides daily updates on Twitter (twitter.com/PRNmedia).

Detailed outlet and contact information is available at agility.prnewswire.com.