MEDIA News: Media Moves at: Conde Nast Traveler, Fortune, Investment News and More…

http://prnbloggers.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/agility-logo.png?w=127&h=125&h=125PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department makes thousands of updates to the  database of journalists and bloggers that underpins our Agility media targeting and distribution platform.  Below is a sampling of recent media moves and news from the research team.  Learn more about Agility media targeting here.

Fortune Magazine (New York, NY): Business Journalist Carol Loomis is retiring after more than 60 years @FortuneMagazine. She was most recently Editor-at-Large. Also, Clifton Leaf (@CliftonLeaf) is the new Deputy Managing Editor.

Conde Nast Traveler (New York, NY): Jennifer Hicks joins @CNTraveler as Associate Publisher.

Investment News (New York, NY): Matt Ackermann (@acketyack) was promoted to Director of Digital Content at @newsfromIN. He was formerly a Digital Editor.

The New York Times (New York, NY): Patricia Cohen (@patcohennyt), who previously covered the Arts since 2007 is moving to the Business Day section @nytimes. She will now report on Economic Policy. In addition, Melena Ryzik (@melenar) has changed beats and is now reporting for the Culture section.

Time (New York, NY): Justin Worland (@Justin Worland) joins @TIME as a Breaking News Reporter.

The Oregonian (Portland, OR): Mark Katches (@markkatches) has joined (@Oregonian) as Editor and Vice President from Center for Investigative Reporting where he served as Editorial Director. Mark officially begins his new role on July 21st.

Smithsonian Magazine (Washington, DC): Former Wired Technology Contributor Clive Thompson (@pomeranian99) will become the Tech Columnist @SmithsonianMag.

Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA): Lorraine Ali (@LorraineAli) switches from Music Editor to Senior Pop Culture Writer for @LATimes.

Fashionista (@Fashionista_com): Steff Yotka (@Steff_Leopard) is now the Market Editor and will be covering fashion markets.

The View (New York, NY): Hosts Jenny McCarthy (@JennyMcCarthy) and Sherri Shepherd (@SherriEShepherd) have left @theviewtv. Ms. Shepherd spent seven years on the set and Ms. McCarthy joined in the fall of 2013.

The Verge (@Verge) (tips@theverge.com): Colin Lecher (@ColinLecher) is now a News Editor.

Women’s Wear Daily (New York, NY): Jayme Cyk (@Cykic) is the new Mass Market Beauty Editor at the outlet.

Rolling Stone (New York, NY): Gus Wenner has been promoted to Head of Digital at @RollingStone.

Fast Company (New York, NY): Harry McCracken (@harrymccracken) joins @FastCompany as a Technology Editor.

Chicago Magazine (Chicago, IL): Publisher and General Manager Rich Gamble is set to leave @ChicagoMag at the end of this month to become Senior Vice President of Operations at the Chicago Zoological Society.

The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, OH): Eighteen-year veteran P-D Sports Reporter Mary Schmitt Boyer is retiring from (@ThePlainDealer).

The Washington Post (Washington, DC): Former Cincinnati Enquirer Sports Editor Angel Rodriguez (@ajrod) is the new Mobile Editor @washingtonpost.

Artnews (New York, NY): Izabela Depczyk is the new Publisher @ARTnewsmag.

WTXF-TV (Philadelphia, PA): Lauren Johnson (@laurendawn) moves from WOFL-TV in Orlando to Philly to be a Morning News Host @FOX29philly.

Nerdist (http://www.nerdist.com): Matt Grosinger (@MattGrosinger) is the new Music Editor @NerdistDotCom.
Bridal Guide (New York, NY): Katie Hoppenjans joins the staff @bridalguidemag as Assistant Fashion and Beauty Editor.

The Alexander City Outlook (Alexander City, AL): Mitch Sneed has joined the @alexcityoutlook as Editor.

The Advocate – New Orleans Bureau (New Orleans, LA): Nick Underhill (@Nick_Underhill) joins the sports team to cover the football beat and the New Orleans Saints @theadvocateno .

Lubbock Avalanche-Journal (Lubbock, TX): Daniel Paulling (@DanielPaulling) joins the Sports team to cover Texas Tech football @lubbockonline.

Southeast Missourian (Cape Girardeau, MO): Former Kentucky New Era Assistant Sports Editor Trent Singer (@KNEtrentsinger) is now a new Sports Reporter @semissourian.

Kennebec Journal (Waterville, ME): Sports Editor/Reporter Gary Hawkins (@GaryHawkinsKJ) is putting down the keyboard after 38 years of Sports Reporting and retiring.

Ionia Sentinel-Standard (Ionia, MI): Chris Zadorozny (@ZadsISS) is the new Sports Editor @IoniaSentStand.

Sedalia Democrat (Sedalia, MO): Sports Reporter Eric Ingles (@Eric_Ingles) was promoted to Sports Editor @SedaliaDemocrat.

Daily Chronicle (Dekalb, IL): Former Yuma Sun Sports Editor Eddie Carifio takes the reins as Sports Editor @Daily_Chronicle.

The Times-Leader (McLeansboro, IL): Jeremy Hall is the new Editor.

Yuma Sun (Yuma, AZ): Sports Reporter Jesse Severson (@YSJesseSeverson) was named the new Sports Editor @yumasun.

Waxahachie Daily Light (Waxahachie, TX): Geoff Gorman (@GeoffNDallas) is the new Sports Editor.

PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department provides daily updates on Twitter (twitter.com/PRNmedia).

Detailed outlet and contact information is available at agility.prnewswire.com.

You can view the full version of MEDIAware here: http://www.prnewswire.com/knowledge-center/public-relations/MEDIAwareJuly72014.html

Safeguarding Brand Visibility on Social Networks

brand hub

Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are all public companies, and as such, their primary objectives are to return profits to their shareholders, not drive visibility for the brands that have developed presences on their platforms.  It’s no secret that social networks strive to make their sites useful and attractive to users, employing algorithms to serve up content that will engage their audiences and keep them on the site longer (thus exposing them to more advertising.)  The recent news of Facebook’s experiment in manipulating user emotions by managing what they see in their newsfeeds is surprising to some, but the reality is this:  the brands we represent are not in control of social presences, and while there’s no doubt social media is a powerful communications medium, communicators are at the mercy of the social network companies and their fiduciary duties to their respective shareholders.

Changes in organic reach of Facebook posts since September 2012. Via Moz.com

The social network companies can make (and have made) significant changes to their platforms, increasing and decreasing visibility for brands seemingly at the drop of a hat.   As a result, except for brands willing to spend heavily on advertising, visibility via social networks can be unpredictable.

Here are four ways brands can safeguard their online visibility and social network traction.

Make your web site or blog the center of your content universe. Instead of using social platforms as the primary repositories for the content your brand produces, concentrate key assets on channels the brand controls.

Use social channels to build awareness and engagement, but don’t invest in creating communities on sites you don’t own.  Social networks are great places to find and interact with like-minded people. However, building communities and groups on sites your brand doesn’t own, for example, creates an asset for the social networking company, not your own brand.   If you’re going to invest in building a community, do so using a channel the brand owns.

Build a multichannel strategy for distributing content and messaging.   Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Building a multichannel approach to distributing content is crucial for building new audiences and maintaining engagement with people who are already connected with a brand.  Social media, commercial newswire services, online communities and a brand’s own digital channels reach different audiences.  Employ a mix, and fine tune messages to fit each, to maximize relevant exposure for your messages. You’ll also be creating a hedge against significant changes in the social media or search engine landscapes.

Let your audience do the talking.  Encourage social sharing (but point people back to your brand’s hub.)  As you develop content and plan strategies, make “social sharing” a goal.  Building content and crafting strategies with social sharing outcomes in mind will not only help amplify brand messages – you’ll build credibility through social proof, as well.   When possible, link shared elements back to your brand’s owned channels.

Using social channels to amplify brand messages while at the same time directing audiences towards digital assets the brand owns and controls enables organizations to capitalize upon the important benefits social media delivers, building visibility and interaction with key audiences  while protecting the brand’s investment in content development and outreach.  In addition to limiting downside risk to the organization in the face of changes in how social networks present brand content, smart communicators can develop traction with audiences on their brands’ own channels, developing increasing the return the organization realizes on the content it develops.

sarah avatarAuthor Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of strategic communications, and is the author of  the ebook Driving Content DiscoveryFollow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

How HuffPo Creates Value With Communities

HuffPost Code recently hosted an event featuring HuffPo’s Director of Community, Tim McDonald, and a discussion of how to develop and maintain communities, offering brands valuable insight into one of the web’s most enthusiastic communities.

The Meaning Behind Community

It is not about what is a community, but more about who is community. Community is about people and having relationships with these people.

McDonald wants his community to be a bunch of “little monsters” that are passionate about his brand and what he does. If he is going to spend his time engaging with this community, then he wants them talking to their friends and their community about his brand. McDonald goes on to say that community management is about being a magnet. You want to draw in your community members and have them be stuck, and you don’t want them to leave once they get there.

Community is very emotional, because people have an emotional connection to your brand. On the other hand, marketing is very transactional — it is a like, a click, a retweet. Those people are not fans, but they are the crowd. Don’t spend your time talking to the crowd, but spend your time talking to your community. Loyalty is about having an emotional bond to something. It is not about getting a discount or frequent flyer card, but it about being a firm supporter of a brand that you don’t work for. But you need to remember to give that supporter something — never forget that. You need to make it about them before you make it about you.

You also need to have a community that is exclusive, which can be as specific as providing an email address, or filling out a survey, or needing people to take the initiative of asking to be part of the community. The exclusivity will depend on the different levels of different objectives.

Case Study One: Exclusive Community

Murph, a Huffington Post member, who frequently comments on the site provides a lot of value because of the way he interacts with other commenters on the site. Murph was given the status of Community Pundit, which allows his comments to be longer and get text formatting. This member really likes it, because nobody else has it.

Murph is very valuable to McDonald, especially, when the change on Huffington Post occured to Facebook verified identies to comment. Before this change occurred, McDonald took the time to let Murph know. Even though Murph wasn’t happy about it, he understand why it was being done. Murph was then going on to other sites where people were bashing Huffington Post and would explain to people why they should give Huffington Post a chance. This isn’t something you can buy or do alone as a brand.

Case Study Two: Connecting With Community Members

When they started HuffPost Live, McDonald met a woman named Tash through customer feedback. In a polite way, Tash asked why they don’t have a search function on HuffPost Live, so she could be alerted to the shows that she wanted to watch instead of needing to tune in and not know when the episodes would show. This search capability exists now, but back then it didn’t, so McDonald emailed her back. He didn’t use the standard email, but he wrote an email thanking her, apologizing to her about her frustration and explaining to her that he doesn’t have a timeline on it but wants to try to make it happen. He ended by saying that if she has any other questions or if he can help her get involved in any other way, to please let me him know, and he provided his phone number and email.

Tash emailed McDonald back. They got in a Google+ Hangout and started talking about what she does and her passions. He was very helpful and interested in her, and at the end of the conversation she asked what she could do for McDonald. Since HuffPost Live just launched, they didn’t have a huge existing database of guests they could call on. Right after that Hangout, Tash introduced McDonald to two or three people, and then the next day she introduced him to more people, etc. Most of the people she introduced him to ended up being guests on HuffPost Live. Tash also gave McDonald the idea to start a small private Facebook group where he could invite some of these guests in and tell them when the shows would come up, and then they could suggest guests for them and McDonald could give these suggestions to the producers.

Experiment

McDonald suggests to always be experimental, because he has realized that if he isn’t failing then he isn’t trying hard enough. Most of us start thinking that we don’t have the finances, resources, or time to do something, but those are all just excuses. He explains that you don’t need to build a huge project where you get everyone to sign off to experiment. McDonald has three rules for testing things: 1) He doesn’t have to ask for anybody’s permission. 2) He doesn’t have to ask for any budget. 3) He won’t get fired for it. He also thinks it may be helpful to find one of the stakeholders that you might be helping and tell them what you’re doing, and make sure they think it is a good idea.

Final Thoughts

McDonald mentions that many people forgot about one amazing tool out there: the telephone. It has helped him connect with many community members in a deeper way than ever before by them hearing his tone, and by him being able respond to questions in an immediate manner. Of course, he says, you don’t need to get on the phone with every single person, but with the people that are valuable to your community — that small group of passionate, raving fans.

 Written by Polina Opelbaum, editor of ProfNet, a service that helps journalists connect with expert sources. To read more from Polina, check out her blog on ProfNet Connect.

Grammar Hammer: Then vs. Than

the Grammar HammerThen Vs. ThanI have a tendency to over think certain grammar rules. Then vs. than is one of those grammar rules that I think I’ve nailed down, but always end up double checking after over thinking it for ten minutes. To save you time and confusion, here are a few ways to remember the correct usage:

“Then” is used to describe an element of time and is used mostly as an adverb.

  • Subsequently or afterwards. Example:  “We worked in the yard for a few hours and then went to the movies.”
  • As a consequence or in that case. Example: “If you don’t clean your room, then you can’t go to the movies.”
  • At that time or that time. Example: “We can first take care of mulching the flower beds then we can go to the movies.”

Then is always used in the construction “if … then.” For example, “If he had just listened to me in the first place, then he wouldn’t have tried using that cheap paint on the walls.”

“Than” conveys a comparison and is often used with comparative words and phrases like more, less, and fewer.

Example #1: “He paid more money for his shoes than she did for hers.”

Example #2: “The sunsets in Hawaii are better than sunsets anywhere else in the world.”

Quick tip:

Than = A = Comparison

Then = E = Time

As with any rule, there are exceptions. For example, “I usually need to go to sleep no later than 10 p.m.” I offer this quick tip with its requisite grain of salt.

For other great resources on this grammar rule, I direct you to CM Punk’s Grammar Slam on then vs. than, or my other favorite grammar poster from The Oatmeal, “Ten Words You Need to Stop Misspelling.”

Have a grammar rule you’d like me to explore? Drop me a line at catherine.spicer@prnewswire.com.

Author Catherine Spicer is a manager of customer content services at PR Newswire.

MEDIA News: Media Moves at: Variety, USA Today, Los Angeles Times and More…

http://prnbloggers.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/agility-logo.png?w=127&h=125&h=125PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department makes thousands of updates to the  database of journalists and bloggers that underpins our Agility media targeting and distribution platform.  Below is a sampling of recent media moves and news from the research team.  Learn more about Agility media targeting here.

Variety (Los Angeles, CA): Debra Birnbaum (@debrabirnbaum) is the new TV Executive Editor and Mark David is a new Reporter covering celebrity real estate for @variety.

USA Today (McLean, VA): White House Correspondent Aamer Madhani (@AamerISmad) has moved to the Chicago Bureau to be a National Correspondent @USATODAY.

The Trentonian (Trenton, NJ): Beginning mid-July, Editor John Berry (@Withhisown38) will join @Trentonian. Currently, he is the Editor at @Middletownpress and @RegisterCitizen, sister papers of The Trentonian all of which are owned by Digital First Media.

Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA): Julie Westfall (@juliewestfall) is the new RealTime News Editor for @latimes.

Orange County Business Journal (Irvine, CA): Paul Hughes joins @OCBizJournal as a Reporter and Web Editor.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA): Former News Journal Assistant Sports Editor Tyler Batiste (@TyBatiste) is the new Digital News Editor @PittsburghPG.

Nylon Magazine (New York, NY): This week Michelle Lee (@MichelleLeeMag) joins @NylonMag and @NYLONGuysMag as Editor-in-Chief.

People StyleWatch (New York, NY): The team @StyleWatchMag welcomes Gena Kaufman (@GenaKaufman) as Social Media Editor.

New York Magazine (New York, NY): Adam Sternbergh (@sternbergh) is returning as a Features Writer and Contributor to @vulture. He was most recently the Culture Editor at The New York Times Magazine.

Chicago Sun-Times.com (Chicago, IL): Zach Finken (@zfinken) has joined Tribune Content Agency as Associate Editor from Executive News Editor @suntimes.

Popular Mechanics (New York, NY): Jacqueline Detwiler (@jacquidetwiler) joins the team @PopMech as Senior Editor.

Financial Times (New York, NY): General Assignment Reporter Shannon Bond (@shannonpareil) has been promoted to US Media and Marketing Correspondent. Ms. Bond has been @FT since 2008 covering consumer goods.

Good Housekeeping (New York, NY): April Franzino rejoins @goodhousemag as Beauty Director. She had previously served as Assistant Beauty Editor there.

SELF (New York, NY): Melissa Ventosa Martin joins @selfmagazine as Fashion Director.

Time (New York, NY): Web Reporter Charlotte Alter (@CharlotteAlter) has been promoted to Writer @TIME. Also moving up the ranks, Daniel Hirschhorn (@DanH_TIME) will now serve as Senior News Editor.

Bethesda Magazine (Bethesda, MD): Former Washingtonian Reporter Cindy Rich joins @Bethesda_Mag as a Senior Editor covering the health scene.

NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA): College Football Reporter Evan Woodbery has left The Knoxville News Sentinel to go pro and become a Football Reporter @NOLAnews. He will be covering the New Orleans Saints.

Tallahassee Democrat (Tallahassee, FL): Assistant Sports Editor Jim Henry (@JimHenryTALLY) has been promoted to Sports Editor @TDOnline.

The Daily Herald (Everett, WA): High School Sports Reporter Aaron Swaney (@swaney_aaron79) is the new Features Editor @EverettHerald.

Stevens Point Journal (Stevens Point, WI): Sari Lesk (@Sari_Lesk) joins @StevensPointJrl as a Reporter covering local government issues.

PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department provides daily updates on Twitter (twitter.com/PRNmedia).

Detailed outlet and contact information is available at agility.prnewswire.com.

Content We Love: Simple Visuals Break Down Big Data

ContentWeLove

Click here to view the press release on PRNewswire.com

Click here to view the press release on PRNewswire.com

Digital technology has given marketers more ways to collect and analyze data than ever before and as a result, glossy infographics have exploded as a favorite content type to make sense of the overabundance of information available. But infographics don’t have to be complex in order to share them with your audience; charts and graphs made with standard computer software are still a highly useful visual representation of data that tells your story in a clear and effective way.

A press release by mobile analytics company Mobidia Technology titled, “King Digital Entertainment Continues to Lead Game Publishers in Most Popular and Most Played Mobile Games,” caught my attention as a prime example.  King Digital is home to the popular Candy Crush app that is fueling procrastination everywhere, but other game developers are quickly on the rise as the next big player on the market. To illustrate this point, the release included photos of two simple graphs depicting highest game usage among the top mobile game publishers, which were subsequently republished in earned media and shared on social.

Other noteworthy aspects of this release that showcase a keen understanding of news distribution as a content marketing tool:

  • Interesting data points are appealing to readers and represented in a visually comprehensible
  • Bullet points break down key information for readers scanning the page, and offer different story angles for media
  • A quote from Mobidia’s Vice President of Marketing promotes the company’s thought-leadership
  • A restrained use of links directs readers to a call to action to download the related white paper

By using these tactics, Mobidia Technology generates more opportunities for raising brand awareness, earning media pickup, and generating leads. Kudos on a job well done!

Author Shannon Ramlochan is the Content Marketing Coordinator at PR Newswire.

The key to press release success: multiple visual elements [Study + infographic]

Press releases with multiple visual assets generate more views, a study by PR Newswire found.

Press releases with multiple visual assets generate more views, a study by PR Newswire found.

How can you get better results with your press releases?  The data is in, and the answer is clear.  Visual illustration of your message is a key driver of success.

PR Newswire’s analytics team recently updated – and significantly expanded – our analysis of press release types, and the results each produces in terms of online views.  For the most recent iteration of this ongoing analysis, we looked at every press release viewed on PRNewswire.com last year, regardless of when it was issued.  Well over one million press releases were measured. 

For the analysis, we broke the release types into the following buckets:

  • Text Only
  • Text + one visual asset, such as a single image or video
  • Text + multiple visuals
  • Fully loaded multimedia press releases and campaign microsites

The results are clear – visuals drive more content views, and adding multiple media assets to your content (press releases, and anything else you publish online, for that matter) generates even better results.

Why visuals improve results:  

One visual is good, more are better.   There are a few reasons why this is the case.

  • Each visual is distributed in its own right, and has its own potential for garnering attention.  In addition to the distribution of visual content the brand either pays for or executes on its own, each visual also has the potential to trigger social sharing, further expanding the audience for the message.
  • Visuals surface story elements that may be overlooked by readers, giving your messages second (and third) chances at connecting with readers.  It’s easy to overlook a theme that’s presented in the middle of the fourth paragraph. However, calling attention to that theme with a visual – a video snippet or image – can help connect that message with readers who care, and who might have glanced over the message initially.
  • Journalists and bloggers are also hunting for visuals to illustrate the digital media they create. While they may not use the visuals your brand provides in their original form,  they will often edit video to fit their stories or derive new works from infographics.  Additionally, including visuals communicates that the story is one that can (and should be) illustrated visually, which will increase the story’s appeal for many digital content creators.

Many communicators note they don’t have ready access to related images when asked why they don’t use more multimedia in their press releases.  Our new Media Studio tool – free for clients using the Online Member Center to upload content for distribution, enables you to store, organize, size, caption and tag images for use in digital content.

If you’d like to speak to someone on our team about adding visuals to your press releases, please contact us here: http://promotions.prnewswire.com/standout2014.html

sarah avatarAuthor Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of strategic communications, and is the author of  the ebook Driving Content DiscoveryFollow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.