Tag Archives: #CMWorld13

3 Ways to Drive Content Discovery (#CMWorld recap + eBook)

In his keynote at Content Marketing World last week, Jay Baer, author of the popular Convince & Convert blog as well as the new book Youtility, made a salient point:  communicators are competing (via social media) with our audiences’ friends and family (not to mention cat videos!) for their attention. Attention is finite, but the amount of content available to our audiences is almost unlimited.

Free Download:  my new ebook, “Driving Content Discovery

In addition to the competition for attention, today’s buyers present communicators with another challenge.

“They’re secret-shopping your brand, all the time,” Baer noted in his keynote, noting that at the point B2B buyers contact vendors, 70% of the decision has been made.  Put another way, buyers eliminate numerous brands from contention without contacting them.  Online content is your brand’s sole representative for much of the buying process. lil tweet

For communicators seeking to connect with target audiences, context and timing are crucial.   But how do you get your message show up at the right place, and at the right time?  This is where content discovery comes into play.  

Context, credibility & timing are crucial 

Delivering content in context –  and with an additional layer of social credibility – tees up your brand in the buyer’s decision process.   Ensuring your content is surfaced continually among a specific constituency is another element of success, and there are a number of tactics communicators can use to achieve consistent, contextual visibility of content.

  • Capitalize on attention opportunities created by industry news trends, by tying messages to trending developments or synching your contnet calendar with the editorial calendars of key publications.
  • Atomize content and repackage it, emphasizing different angles or message elements, to increase audience attraction.
  • Distribute focused and specific content using a variety of platforms and channels.  As Baer noted, you have to put some effort behind the content you publish. Commercial newswires and free PR sites can provide important visibility for key messages.  (Here’s a free content distribution buyers guide you can use to arm yourself with questions to help you find the right vendor.)

The embedded slide deck and ebook download offer many more tactics for driving the discovery of your content, as well as numerous real-life examples.  And if I’ve overlooked your favorite tactic for ensuring your audience sees your message, I’d love to hear about it in the comments!

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of the e-books Unlocking Social Media for PR and the newly-published  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

Content is …. many things [Infographic]

We invited attendees at Content Marketing World to complete this sentence: “Content is ____ .”  Here are some of the answers we received.

PRN_ContentIs

The 4 Archetypes Your Content Needs to Reflect to be Successful

In his session at Content Marketing World this week, Robert Rose (@robert_rose) noted that marketers aren’t in the business of creating content – they’re in the business of creating belief.

Our audiences, he noted, want to believe the best of the best.  Rose shared the quote (paraphrased) from the Street Car Named Desire character Blanche DeBois: “I want magic.  I tell what ought to be the truth.”  It is our jobs as marketers to move into that realm of belief.

In order to create belief, it’s useful to keep the four archetypes of content creation in mind, as well as their corresponding roles in the communications cycle.

  • Promoter – Focus on audience needs and wants.
  • Preacher – Focus on discovery and answers.
  • Professor – Focus on interest and passion.
  • Poet – Focus on feelings and beliefs.

The most successful campaigns mix the archetypes, enabling the brand to not just grab attention, but to keep it as well.   The content we create needs to perform different functions, from generating broad awareness to cultivating interest, then to inspiring action and finally encouraging evangelism.   In many cases, brands develop voices that take the form of one or two archetypes, ignoring the others, creating gaps in the content that doesn’t support the complete buying journey.  Assessing one’s own content objectively, using the four archtypes as a framework for doing so, is a great way to find the weak spots in the content strategy while also providing a guide for their repair.

Author Michael Isopi is a senior member of PR Newswire’s account management team.  Based in Detroit, he specializes in the automotive marketplace.

Your Content Needs a Downstream Strategy

Brian Clark of Copyblogger at #CMWorld

Brian Clark of Copyblogger at #CMWorld

I’m up early, noodling on the input from day one of Content Marketing World, and just realized the great advice I heard yesterday all has a common theme, and it’s this:  content needs a downstream strategy.

Over the years we’ve heard a lot about planning editorial calendars, developing buyer personas, doing keyword research and plumbing social conversations for insights that together will help you create and publish amazing content your audience will love. However, almost all the speakers yesterday talked in some form about what happens post-publication.  Or, more specifically, what needs to happen.

Promote your content.  Both Jay Baer and Todd Wheatland emphasized the importance of supporting your own content, and they weren’t talking about just posting a few tweets.   Wheatland noted that most viral videos were boosted at some point with paid promotion.  And Baer went further, noting that advertising isn’t the content marketer’s competition – it’s an enabler that drives qualified views.  Advertising campaigns and PR can fuel significant visibility for the content your brand produces, and in addition to exposure to the audience, they can generate media along the way, which will launch your content into a different stratosphere.

Own the authorship. Copyblogger’s Brian Clark made no bones about the fact that authorship is becoming increasingly important, both in Google’s eyes and  in affecting individual decisions about consuming content.  Rel=author and rel=publisher tags, which essentially authenticate the source of the content by creating a linkage between the content and either a person’s or a brand’s Google+ page, will play an increasingly important role in surfacing content, as Google de-emphasizes anonymous content.   And according to Clark, authorship is something we need to be paying attention to when writing articles or guest posts.  “Who gets the canonical link is a negotiating point,” he noted in his session.

What’s the driver behind this new focus on content post-publication? Without a doubt it’s the finite amount of audience attention, and the spectacular amount of content every marketer is competing with today.  As Baer noted in his presentation, we’re competing for that attention with our audiences spouses, friends and family — not to mention cute baby animal videos — within Facebook news feeds, on Twitter and in almost every other social network.  The simple act of publishing great content is no guarantee of success.  To win qualified attention, content needs support, promotion and a badge of authenticity. In short, we need to build downstream strategies into our content planning.

Driving Content Discovery: TODAY at Content Marketing World – 10:45 a.m., Ballroom C 

We heard Jay Baer say “Market your marketing.” Today at Content Marketing World I’ll be talking about  exactly that,  in a session titled “10 Online Discovery Tips that Will Get Your Content Promoted.”   It’s scheduled for 10:45 and will be in Ballroom C.   I’ll be offering 19 (instead of the previously advertised 10) ways to build an element of discovery into your content strategy, and to promote the discovery of the information your brand publishes.  Hope to see you there! 

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of the e-books Unlocking Social Media for PR and the newly-published  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

 

The Future of Content in Search & on the Social Web

Content is more than information – it’s storytelling that provides meaningful experiences and inspires action.  Lee Odden (@leeodden) of TopRank Online Marketing drove home the importance of emotion as he delved into the “Future of Content on Search and Social Web” at Content Marketing World (#CMWorld) earlier today.

The future of content is visual, real-time, mobile, human and cross-platform, he says. Simply put, it’s about creating things that make us go “mmmmm” — the art of inspiring feeling.  Find that “moment in the experience” that contributes to a moment of inquiry becoming a lead, he says.

One important piece of research is to find out which channels your customers respond to best and then work to create content that causes reaction. “Communities and customers are dynamic and insatiable – we have to feed them.”

Statistics reveal that viewers are 85% more likely to purchase a product after watching a product video.  Odden says the cycle is to attract, engage, convert and to continue the flow.

And there’s no question — today’s marketing teams have their work cut out for them when assigning functions. Marketing is a bigger job today than it has ever been. Strategy, creation, production, search, social and analytics are all critical roles today, and all overlap in content.

Vlogger Diane Harrigan (@dianeharrigan) authors the Postcards from SF blog, and is also an account manager with PR Newswire.

6 Visual Content Trends from Content Marketing World

tw chant

If anyone in the Content Marketing World session featuring Todd Wheatland titled “Visual Content Marketing Strategies You Probably Aren’t Using and Should,” had any doubts about the importance of visuals in a content strategy, it’s very safe to say that their doubts were allayed.  Incorporating visuals into campaigns is no longer an option for marketers, it’s an imperative. 

However, as is the case in social media, search engine optimization and pretty much any other marketing discipline, the best practices for using visual content are constantly changing, because the tools, channels and networks we use to consume that content is always evolving.  Here are the top trends and tips Todd shared today.

  1. Short form video.  The biggest news about Twitter this year is Vine. Instagram is going all in on video, and they’re using the 15 second format that is already a standard broadcast TV medium.   Bonus: it’s mobile friendly.
  2. Paid promotion.  Did you know that most viral videos have been given a big leg up through paid promotion?  If you want your video to go viral, first be certain that it is fantastic.  Then get out the wallet and buy some promo.  Wednesday at Content Marketing World – learn to drive discovery of YOUR content  
  3. Explainer videos.  Explainers are 60-90 second calling cards for your brand that cut to the chase, explaining what the company does and why you should work with them. (Here’s an explainer we created for Multivu.  
  4. Using visuals to repurpose (and refresh) old content.  Create a video or graphic to illustrate an old blog post or paper, to reinvigorate the message and trigger social sharing.  
  5. Multichannel communications.  One important benefit of visual content is that it works well across platforms (computers, tablets, phones) and networks (social media, web, on demand.) Visuals are very good for reaching audiences where they live.   
  6. Animated GIFs. 

Tomorrow at Content Marketing World I’ll be presenting on driving content discovery,  in a session titled “10 Online Discovery Tips that Will Get Your Content Promoted.

I’ll be offering 19 (instead of the previously advertised 10) ways to build an element of discovery into your content strategy, and to promote the discovery of the information your brand publishes.  Here’s a sneak peek:

CMW session snippet

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of the e-books Unlocking Social Media for PR and the newly-published  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

 

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Market Your Marketing

cmscribblesContent Marketing World kicked off this  morning with Jay Baer (@jaybaer), author of Youtility.  The top-rated speaker of CMW last year, Jay didn’t disappoint today.

Echoing the themes of his book, Jay insisted that the best marketing content is that which is so good people would pay for it.  However, the conversation took an intersting turn when Jay started to talk about promoting the content your brand publishes.

Content is crucial to buying decisions – the number of sources buyers rely upon has almost doubled over the last year. And according to Google, B2B buyers routinely complete 70% of their research before talking to a vendor rep.

Everyone is talking about content promotion at #CMWorld 13

Everyone is talking about content promotion at #CMWorld 13

Publishing isn’t enough

But publishing content isn’t enough.   Jay noted that the convergence of our personal and commercial lives means that marketers are competing against friends, family and cat videos for audience attention.

Wednesday at Content Marketing World – learn to drive discovery of YOUR content 

One way Jay suggests that brands create visibility for their content is to “make the story bigger” than just your products or services. Solve problems in your customers’ lives, not just around what you sell.

However, being dead useful to your audience is just part of the equation.  Driving discovery of your content is crucial too.

Marketing your messaging 

“Market your marketing, ” Jay encouraged the assembled faithul. “Put some effort behind it.  Advertising isn’t the competition – it’s an enabler.”

Both paid and social media should be part of the plan.

Social media:  Content is fire, says Jay.  And social media is gasoline. However, don’t make the mistake of treating tweets like the world’s shortest press releases.  Social posts still need to be useful.

Paid media: Advertising campaigns and PR can fuel significant visibility for the content your brand produces.  You may even earn some media along the way, which will launch your content into a different stratosphere.

Tomorrow at Content Marketing World I’ll be presenting on driving content discovery,  in a session titled “10 Online Discovery Tips that Will Get Your Content Promoted.

I’ll be offering 19 (instead of the previously advertised 10) ways to build an element of discovery into your content strategy, and to promote the discovery of the information your brand publishes.  Here’s a sneak peek:

CMW session snippet

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of the e-books Unlocking Social Media for PR and the newly-published  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.