Tag Archives: targeting

4 Best Practices for Distributing a Global Press Release

Brand Marketer Summit

Your boss comes into your office and says that the major new product release you’ve been working on for the past month now needs to be sent all over the world.  “Global” is what he says before walking out the door and into a meeting, leaving you in a panicked frenzy of where t0 even begin. These four tips can help you reduce your anxiety when distributing a global press release:

Decide on the specific countries or regions you wish to target

The first step is to determine exactly what your boss means by “Global.”  Unless this is truly breaking news and you have a large budget, sending it to every country on the planet isn’t likely what he meant.  You’ll need to pin down the countries that are most important to your company, your client, or your news. If you don’t know which countries to target, check with your marketing department.  Mirroring their efforts is usually a good idea.

If they come back to you with general regions, such as “Europe” or “Asia,” it’s best to try to pin it down a bit more.  Western Europe?  Scandinavia?  The EU? What about Eastern Europe?  Do the same for all regions where you received generalities until you have a target list of countries or mini-regions.  This will help you keep your costs down, and your boss happy.

Modify your release to create localized versions

Sending one release to all markets globally sounds like the easiest way to go – one release to run up the corporate approval chain – but that is not always the best way to get your news to generate quality earned media.  Having tailored versions targeted at specific countries, regions, or mini-regions is your best bet if you’re measuring results by the number of clips your receive. I usually counsel clients to prepare a few different versions of the news release, clearly marked for the destination, and send them up the approval chain at the same time.

You don’t have to make too many changes to see a tangible difference in your results.  Modify the release in the headline, subhead, first paragraph, any bullet points or quotes, and make sure the changes are specific to the target area.  For example, “XYZ Inc. announces a new chip designed to regulate power in ________” as a headline.  Insert country, region or mini-region in the space. The quote can be completely localized in each version, and frankly, works best that way.

If you have a local contact, be sure to list that person first on the release destined for that country or region.  It will increase your chance of getting a journalist call if there are any questions, or if a follow-up interview is requested.

Provide accurate translations

Once you have your list of countries, you will need to translate the copy into those respective languages or adjust certain phrases to accommodate specific markets. Look to see if you have translation capability in your local offices that will help you keep your costs down.   If you don’t have those resources, or your local teams don’t have time, be sure to ask if they want to see the translations you’ll have done to further localize.

Translations take about 1-2 business days per 800 words of your release, so plan accordingly when working on your timeline.  If you have requested to approve the translations prior to sending out, please add time for your internal approval chain to the processing time.

Coordinate your distribution times  

Sending to all regions of the world simultateously isn’t a good idea.  Because of that whole ’round world’ thing, someone important  is going to be asleep and miss your news.   You can target the timing for simultaneous distribution in Europe, Middle East and Africa at the same time as the Americas (if you don’t mind a very early distribution time), but Asia will need to wait until later on in the day, when they get in.  You don’t need to change your dateline for the Asian release if you don’t wish – it should only slightly affect your results, if at all.

Distributing a global press release doesn’t have to be as daunting as it seems. It essentially all comes down to targeting your news specifically to each country and paying close attention to cultural distinctions and time zones of each region.

Interested in learning more about sharing your news around the world? View the on-demand webinar, “Thriving in a Mobile Driven World” and learn how to format your press releases to reach the global audiences who are increasingly relying on mobile devices to consume information.

Register here

Author Colleen Pizarev is PR Newswire’s Vice President of Communications Strategies in International Services. 

4 Ways Healthcare Communicators Can Educate and Connect with Patients

Featured panelists during the Q&A session at the Future of Healthcare Communications Summit

Featured panelists during the Q&A session at the Future of Healthcare Communications Summit

According to Manhattan Research’s President, Meredith Ressi, 65% of online consumers say that the internet is critical for obtaining medical information. Now that the Affordable Care Act has taken effect, the healthcare market is experiencing an influx of diverse consumers who are increasingly relying on digital and mobile technology to educate themselves. It is up to healthcare communicators then, to evolve their tactics in order to help patients navigate the ACA’s complex policies. Industry thought-leaders featured at the Future of Healthcare Communications Summit, co-presented by Business Development Institute and PR Newswire, offered their perspective on how healthcare communicators can utilize digital platforms to inform and motivate patients to better manage their well-being.

Engage audiences with multimedia to simplify complex ideas

PR Newswire’s Global Director of Emerging Media, Michael Pranikoff, notes that 85% of brands publish content, but only 35% believe they are doing so effectively. The likely issue is that complicated messages are driving audiences away and leading them straight to competitors.  Instead, multimedia content such as videos allow complex ideas to be simplified in a concise format that grabs audience attention and amplifies visibility. Engagement on social channels such as Youtube, Instagram, and Pintrest is primarily driven by images, so communicators who do not employ visual tactics are squandering additional opportunities for their message to be seen.

Furthermore, consumers have become more aware of overt marketing tactics and are not interested in brazen sales pitches. Videos focus more on storytelling than on the brand, which helps build a mutual trust. As Pranikoff says, “If you are not providing visuals, you are not taking control of your messages.”

Communicate clinical innovations through earned media

Patients with special conditions need to know where they can turn to for help. Johns Hopkins Medicine shares their success stories involving biomedical discoveries, patient survival, and highly qualified physicians to establish the organizations credibility as a leader in the health community. According to Dalal Haldeman, Senior Vice President of Marketing and Communications at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the brand was recognized by 80.2% of participants in a national survey against the most recognizable consumer brands such as McDonald’s, Google, and Coca-Cola. Brand recognition is immensely important to the patients who are putting their lives into the hands of healthcare providers, and earned media is one of the best ways to build that trust.

Be aware of language and cultural considerations before utilizing a specific communications tool

Consumers are making their own decisions on treatment providers, but different audiences are using different channels to shop for their plans. For example, Makovsky’s Executive Vice President, Gil Bashe, reports that African Americans are most likely to use smartphones to access healthcare information more than any other group. Understanding the demographic usage behind each communication tool can help segment the market and target the messages that are most appropriate for those audiences.

Top support and solutions that online consumers want from pharma

Top support and solutions that online consumers want from pharma

Listen to social conversations and use this information to inform your health programs

The rise of consumerism has created an environment focused on collaboration and engagement in the healthcare industry. A study by Manhattan Research finds that 59% of online consumers are interested in patient support to learn more about their conditions and how to cope. Social conversations provide a context for the types of information that patients are looking for. Using data analysis, healthcare providers can develop more sophisticated programs to connect patients with their communities.

The statutes of the Affordable Care Act are still largely misunderstood by the public, giving healthcare communicators an important opportunity to fill the information gap. But in order to do so effectively, healthcare communicators need to embrace the new age of interaction that is less product-focused and more patient-focused. Digital and mobile technology makes it possible to speak directly to patients in an environment they feel most comfortable in. By utilizing visuals, customizing messages, and listening to social conversations, healthcare communicators can better prepare the public to take increased responsibility for their own health management.

MEDIA News: Media Moves at Wall Street Journal, Forbes, The Atlantic and More

http://prnbloggers.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/agility-logo.png?w=127&h=125&h=125PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department makes thousands of updates to the  database of journalists and bloggers that underpins our Agility media targeting and distribution platform.  Below is a sampling of recent media moves and news from the research team.  Learn more about Agility media targeting here.

Wall Street JournalThe Wall Street Journal (New York, NY): Former CNBC Reporter John Carney (@carney) will now work the “Heard on the Street” column @WSJ. His focus will be on Wall Street, Finance and the Banks. Beth Reinhard (@BethReinhard) is the new National Politics Reporter. And Andrew Tangel (@AndrewTangel) of The Los Angeles Times (@LATimes) joins the Journal (@WSJ) as a Transportation Reporter.

The Wall Street Journal – San Francisco Bureau (San Francisco, CA): USA Today Technology Reporter Alistair Barr (@alistairmbarr) joins WSJ’s San Francisco Bureau as a Technology Reporter.

ForbesForbes (New York, NY): Staff Writer Jacquelyn Smith (@JacquelynVSmith) is no longer at @Forbes. Assuming her vacated position as Staff Writer, covering Careers, is Kathryn Dill (@KathrynDill). Dill joined the publication as an Associate Reporter in June 2013. In addition, Nin-Hai Tseng (@ninhaitseng) has been promoted to Contributors Editor reviewing Op-Ed submissions.

The Atlantic  The Atlantic (Washington, D.C.): Chris Heller (@C_Heller) has been promoted to Senior Associate Editor and Eleanor Barkhorn (@EleanorBarkhorn) is now a Senior Education Editor here (@TheAtlantic). Also Associate Editor/Science Rebecca Rosen (@beccarosen) has been promoted to Business Channel Editor.

BuzzFeed BuzzFeed (New York, NY): Former Newsweek Reporter Katie J.M. Baker (@katiejmbaker) will join @BuzzFeed in April. She will cover social issues and criminal justice in relation to higher education. Naomi Zeichner (@NomiZeichner) is now the Music Editor. Molly Hensley-Clancy (@Molly_HC) will join in March as the new Business of Education Reporter.

Washington Post The Washington Post (Washington, DC): Former Associated Press scribe Katie Zezima (@katiezez) is the new White House Correspondent @washingtonpost. And Politico Jason Millman (@JasonMillman) and The Atlantic’s Emily Badger (@emilymbadger) are joining Washington Post’s Wonkblog (@Wonkblog).

The Boston GlobeThe Boston Globe (Boston, MA): Kathleen Kingsbury (@katiekings) is the new Sunday Op-Ed Editor @BostonGlobe.

Whisky Advocate Whisky Advocate (Emmaus, PA): Geoff Kleinman (@geoffk) is now a Contributing Editor at this “spirited” magazine (@WhiskyAdvocate).

Times Free Press Chattanooga Times Free Press (Chattanooga, TN): Features and Religion Reporter Clint Cooper (@CooperCTFP) is now the Free Press Editorial Page Editor here (@timesfreepress).

FOX & Friends (New York, NY): Producer Laurie Weiner has left the show.

FOX Business  Fox Business Network (New York,NY): Deirdre Bolton (@DeirdreBolton) has accepted a host position at Fox Business (@FoxBusiness).

Mahoning Valley Parent and Trumbull County Parent (Youngstown, OH): The lifestyle magazines have named Megan Smith as the new Editor.

CantonRep.com The Repository (Canton, OH): The daily (@CantonRepdotcom) has named Laura Kessel (@LauraKesselREP) Managing Editor. She joins the publication after serving in the same position for The News-Herald (@newsheraldinoh) in Willoughby, Ohio.

WKYC Channel 3 News WKYC-TV (Cleveland, OH): Anchor Robin Swoboda (@Robinswoboda) is leaving the NBC station (@wkyc) at the end of this month.

WOIO-TV/WUAB-TV (Cleveland, OH): General Manager Bill Applegate is set to retire from the Raycom Media owned duopoly (@19ActionNews) in April.

Enquirer Cincinnati Enquirer (Cincinnati, OH): The Cincinnati Bengals Beat Reporter Joe Reedy (@joereedy) is leaving the daily (@Enquirer).

WHAS11 News WHAS-TV (Louisville, KY): Josh Eure has been named Executive News Director at the ABC station (@WHAS11).

FOX19WXIX-TV (Cincinnati, OH): Investigative Reporter Matthew Nordin (@MatthewNordin) is leaving the Fox station (@FOX19).

Style.com (New York, NY): Noah Johnson (@noahvjohnson) has been named Deputy Editor. He will assume his new role at the end of the month. He previously held the same position @ComplexMag.

Rolling Stone (New York, NY): Investigative Reporter Matt Taibbi (@mtaibbi) is no longer with the magazine.

WATE 6 News WATE-TV (Knoxville, TN): Long-time Sports Director Jim Wogan is leaving WATE-TV (@6News) in June.

actionnews5WMC-TV (Memphis, TN): Tracey Rogers is the new VP/GM at WMC-TV (@actionnews5). She arrives from KAIT-TV (@Region8News) in Jonesboro, AR.

THV 11 KTHV-TV (Little Rock, AR): This Little Rock station (@thv11) has hired two Reporters from Virginia. Alyssa Raymond and Dan Grossman both join from TV3 in Winchester.

Y107.9 WXYY-FM (Hilton Head, SC): Tony Bristol is the new Program Director at WXYY-FM (@y1079). He arrives from Providence, R.I.

The Tennessean The Tennessean (Nashville, TN): Former Detroit Free Press Assistant Managing Editor Stefanie Murray is now a VP with The Tennessean (@tennessean).

CBS Atlanta NewsWGCL-TV (Atlanta, GA): Reporter Jennifer Mayerle of WGCL-TV (@cbsatl) has given her notice. She will join WCCO-TV (@wcco) as a Reporter in Minneapolis in April.

CF LifestyleCentral Florida Lifestyle (Orlando, FL): This lifestyle magazine (@CFLifestyleMag) welcomes Lyndsay Fogarty as an Associate Editor.

St. Augustine RecordThe St. Augustine Record (St. Augustine, FL): Phillip Heilman (@phillip_heilman) is now a Sports Writer @StAugRecord.

Entertainment Weekly Entertainment Weekly (New York, NY): Matt Bean (@MattBean1) has joined Entertainment Weekly (@EW) as the new Editor-in-Chief.

People magazinePeople Magazine (New York, NY): After 26 years, Peter Castro (@PCastroEditor) is leaving People (@PeopleMag). Bronwyn Barnes (@BronwynBarnes) joins as Senior Style Editor. She was formerly Senior Editor at Entertainment Weekly (@EW).

The Progressive The Progressive (Madison, WI): Elizabeth DiNovella (@LizDiNovella) is no longer the Culture Editor at The Progressive (@TheProgressive).

Psychology Today Psychology Today (New York, NY): Gary Drevitch (@GaryDrevitch) is the newest Senior Editor at Psychology Today (@PsychToday).

Us Weekly Us Weekly (New York, NY): Journalist Rachel LeWinter (@Rachel_LeWinter) has joined Us Weekly (@UsWeekly) as a Senior Market Editor.

Capitol File Mag Capitol File (Washington, DC): Suzy Draddy Jacobs is the new Publisher @capitolfilemag.

CapitalGazette.com The Capital (Annapolis, MD): Ted Black is a new Sports Reporter at The Capital (@capgaznews) .

VANITY FAIR Vanity Fair (New York, NY): Vanity Fair (@VanityFair) welcomes Michael Kinsley (@michaelkinsley) as Contributing Editor and Columnist.

Business Insider Business Insider (New York, NY): Hunter Walker (@hunterw) joins @BusinessInsider as the new Politics Editor.

The Am Law DailyThe American Lawyer (New York, NY): The American Lawyer (@AmLawDaily) welcomes Kimberly Kleman (@kdkleman) as Editor-in-Chief.

TheWrap TheWrap (Internet): TheWrap (@thewrap) welcomes Jordan Zakarin (@jordanzakarin) as Film Reporter; Inkoo Kang (@thinkovision) as Film Critic; James Crugnale (@jamescrugnale) as Media Reporter; and L.A. Ross (@newsielady) as Blogger/Reporter.

GeekWireGeekwire (@Geekwire)(tips@geekwire.com): Tricia Duryee (@Triciad) has been hired at here as a Reporter.

Mashable Mashable (@Mashable) (news@mashable.com): Brian Ries (@MoneyRies) joins the Mashable team as the Real-Time News Editor. Eli Epstein (@EliEpsteinYO) has been hired by the outlet as a Branded Content Writer.

ProPublica ProPublica (Internet): Heather Vogell and Ryan Gabrielson (@RyanGabrielson)have been hired as Reporters at here.

Salon.com Salon.com (@Salon): Author Thomas Frank has joined Salon.com as a Politics and Culture Columnist.

VentureBeatVentureBeat (@VentureBeat):  Jolie O’Dell (@jolieodell) is now Managing Editor for VentureBeat (@venturebeat) while Harrison Weber (@HarrisonWeber) joins as News Editor. Meanwhile  Rebecca Grant (@BekahGrant) is no longer a writer for the weblog.

POLITICO Politico (Arlington, VA): Steven Shepard (@HotlineSteve) is leaving The Hotline (@njhotline) to cover campaigns and elections @politico.

BloomReach Inc. BloomReach (Internet): Former San Jose Mercury News Business Columnist Mike Cassidy joins BloomReach (@bloomreachinc) as a Staff Writer.

The Doctors The Doctors (Los Angeles, CA): Leslie Marcus joins The Doctors (@thedoctors) as a Producer. Leslie was previously with KSWB-TV.

BayAreaNewsGroup (San Jose, CA): Sharon Ryan has been named President and Publisher of 11 BayAreaNewsGroup newspapers, including Contra Costa Times (@cctimes) and San Jose Mercury News (@mercnews).

Carla Correa FiveThirtyEight (nrsilver@gmail.com): Carla Correa (@PinkGrammar) has joined the political blog as the General Editor.

SheKnows She Knows (@SheKnows): Lauren Swanson (@SheKnowsLauren) has been promoted to Director of Editorial Operations at the outlet.

Austin Statesman Austin American-Statesman (Austin, TX): After 40 years, Editorial Page Editor Arnold Garcia has parted ways with the Austin American-Statesman (@statesman).

The Oregonian The Oregonian (Portland, OR): Gina Mizell (@ginamizell) is set to begin in her new role as Reporter on March 17, to cover Oregon State Football for @Oregonian.

MEDIAware’s full weekly version can be found at:www.prnewswire.com/knowledge-center/medi…

PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department provides daily updates on Twitter (twitter.com/PRNmedia).

Detailed outlet and contact information is available at Agility (agility.prnewswire.com).

MEDIA News: Media Moves at The Washington Post, Inc., Dr. Oz The Good Life and more…

http://prnbloggers.files.wordpress.com/2012/07/agility-logo.png?w=127&h=125&h=125PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department makes thousands of updates to the  database of journalists and bloggers that underpins our Agility media targeting and distribution platform.  Below is a sampling of recent media moves and news from the research team.  Learn more about Agility media targeting here.

Washington Post The Washington Post (Washington, DC): Catherine Rampell (@crampell) has left The New York Times (@nytimes) to write her opinions at the Post (@washingtonpost). And former Business Insider Adam Taylor (@mradamtaylor) has joined to the Post as a Foriegn Affairs Reporter/Blogger he’ll be contributing to the “WorldViews” blog (http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/).

Dr. Oz THE GOOD LIFE Dr. Oz The Good Life (New York, NY): This healthy lifestyle magazine (@DrOzTheGoodLife) debuted on February 4th. Alison Brower (@abrower) is the Editor.

Inc. Inc. (New York. NY): Former Thomson Reuters Op-Ed Editor James Ledbetter (@jledbetter) is now the Editor @Inc. Articles Editor Bobbie Gossage (@BobbieGossage) has been promoted to Executive Editor.

The Boston Globe The Boston Globe (Boston, MA): Douglas Most (@GlobeDougMost) has been promoted from Deputy Managing Editor/Features to Deputy Managing Editor/Special Sections & New Initiatives. Film Editor Janice Page has been promoted to Deputy Managing Editor/ Features. Both work for The Globe (@BostonGlobe)

The Late Late Show The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Los Angeles, CA): Former “Tonight Show with Jay Leno” Producer, Mike Alexander joins this show (@LateLateShowCBS).

CNN Latino CNN Latino (Miami, FL): After less than a year on the air, CNN (@CNN) is cancelling its CNN Latino (@cnnlatino) programming at the end of this month.

GuardianUS The Guardian America – New York Bureau (Washington, DC): Ex-New York Times Opinion Writer Matthew Sullivan (@sullduggery) is the new Opinion Editor at The Guardian’s U.S. operation (@GuardianUS).

Wall Street Journal The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY): Daniel Keeler (@dankeeler) has joined @WSJ as Frontier Markets Editor. He also curates the @FrontierMarkets Twitter handle. In addition, Reporter Jonathan Shieber (@jshieber) is no longer at the paper.

InvestmentNews InvestmentNews (New York, NY): Mason Brawell (@MasonBraswell),  former On Wall Street Editor, joins InvestmentNews (@newsfromIN) as a Reporter.

The New York Times The New York Times (New York, NY): Chief Fashion Critic and Editor Cathy Horyn has resigned. Prior to joining @NYTFashion in 1999, Cathy was a Contributing Editor @VanityFair.

Popular Mechanics Popular Mechanics (New York, NY): Former Associate Editor Andrew Del-Colle (@andrewdelcolle) has been promoted to Senior Editor. He has been an Editor @popmech since 2011.

HLN News and Views HLN Network (New York, NY): “Showbiz Tonight”, (@shobiztonight) hosted by A.J. Hammer (@ajhammer), aired its final show on February 6. Hammer will continue to report on Entertainment for HLN.

Azteca America Azteca America (New York, NY): Alfonso De Pansa (@ponchodeanda) will be back on the air with his new show “Venga la Alegría”, on TV Azteca (@tvaztecaoficial) (@Azteca_America) beginning February 10th, 2014.

Re/code Re/code (New York, NY): Another former @WSJ Technology Reporter joins @recode. Amy Schatz (@Amy_Schatz) will cover the FCC and Technology Policy and Regulation.

Time Out New York Time Out New York (New York, NY): Senior Film Writer Joshua Rothkopf (@joshrothkopf) has been promoted to Film Editor. Rothkopf began @TimeOutNewYork as a Film Staff Writer in 2004.

Businessweek Bloomberg Businessweek (New York, NY): Former Associated Press Writer Francesca Levy (@FrancescaToday) has joined @BW as Business Schools Editor.

VANITY FAIR Vanity Fair (New York, NY): The Fair (@VanityFair) welcomes Priya Rao (@Prao11) as their new Style Editor.

Betabeat BetaBeat (@Betabeat): Ryan Holiday (@RyanHoliday) has joined the New York Observer (@NewYorkObserver) as the Editor-at-Large for their technology blog BetaBeat.

Columbus Dispatch The Columbus Dispatch (Columbus, OH): Reporter Jeannie Nuss (@JeannieNuss) has joined the daily (@DispatchAlerts) as Features Reporter. Nuss previously served as a Reporter for the Associated Press covering Little Rock, Arkansas.

Gawker Gawker (@Gawker): Cord Jefferson (@CordJefferson) is no longer an editor at this outlet. Meanwhile, Jay Hathaway (@Strutting) has been hired as a Senior Writer.

Tasting Table Tasting Table (@TastingTable): Lizzie Amunro (@LizzieAMunro) has been hired by Tasting Table as the new Associate Editor. Restaurant Critic Tajal Rao (@TejalRao) has also joined the outlet as a Staff Writer.

CommDigiNews Communities Digital News (Washington, DC): This former entity of the Washington Times has gone independent with their own world news site (http://www.commdiginews.com) that covers everything in the world and Jacquie Kubin (@Jacquie_Kubin) is in charge.

WGN TV News WGN-TV (Chicago, IL): Tribune’s nightly newscast (@WGNNews) has been dropped from WGN America’s (@wgnamerica) schedule. The hour-long 9:00 p.m. newscast, Anchored by Mark Suppelsa (@MarkSuppelsa) (msuppelsa@tribune.com) and Micah Materre (@mmaterre) will continue to air locally but will no longer be carried on the cable channel nationwide.

Macworld MacWorld (San Francisco, CA): Executive Editor Jonathan Seff has left @macworld.

The Week The Week Magazine (New York, NY): Former Washington Monthly Web Editor Ryan Cooper (@ryanlcooper) is the new National Correspondent at The Week.

USA TODAY USA Today (McLean, VA): Izzy Gould (@IzzyGould) is tackling the role of NFL Editor at America’s newspaper.

Digiday Digiday (@Digiday) (saya@digiday.com): Ricardo Bilton (@RBilton) has entered the digital lair as a Digital Publishing Reporter.

The Information The Information (@TheInformation): Jonathan Weber (@WeberWest) is the new Managing Editor.

Quartz Quartz (New York, NY): Max Nisen (@MaxNisen) tackles the Management News Reporter role @qz.

SEJournal Search Engine Journal (@sejournal): Kelsey Jones (@wonderwall7) is the new Managing Editor.

HouBizJournal Houston Business Journal (Houston, TX): Former Wall Street Journal Reporter Mark Yost (@HBJmoney) signs onto the Journal (@HOUBizJournal) as a Money Reporter.

ABQ Business First Albuquerque Business First (Albuquerque, NM): Rachel Sams has been promoted from Managing Editor to Editor-in-Chief at the weekly business paper (@ABQBizFirst). She takes over for the departing Joe Renaud.

O.C. Register Orange County Register (Santa Ana, CA): Columnist Frank Mickadeit has parted ways @OCRegister.

Zócalo Public Square Zócalo Public Square (@thepublicsquare): Former Los Angeles Times Reporter Jia-Rui Cook (@jahree) joins Zócalo Public Square as National and Science Editor.

Austin Way Magazine Austin Way Magazine (Austin, TX):  This magazine (@AustinWayMag)  (http://www.austinway.com) is a new lifestyle publication by Niche Media and is set to launch September 2014. The magazine will cover topics related to local community and culture. Lou DeLone is the Publisher.

U.S. News U.S. News & World Report (@USNews): Rachel Pomerance (@RachelPomerance) will no longer be a Health & Wellness Reporter for the site.

NOLA.com NOLA.com (New Orleans, LA): Christopher Dabe (@cmdabe), Sports Editor at Gannett Central Wisconsin Media, was named Managing Sports Producer.

SF Chronicle The San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA): Thomas Lee (@bytomlee) joins the San Francisco Chronicle (@sfchronicle) as Business Editor. Lee was previously with the Star Tribune.

Financial Times Financial Times – Los Angeles (Los Angeles, CA): Matthew Garrahan (@MattGarrahan) promoted to Global Media Editor of Financial Times (@FinancialTimes). Matthew will move from LA to NY this summer.

The Weekly Standard This Week – ABC Television Network (New York, NY): The Weekly Standard’s (@weeklystandard) Editor/Publisher Bill Kristol has joined ABC’s “This Week” (@ThisWeekABC) as a Contributor.

Columbus C.E.O. Columbus CEO (Columbus, OH): Journalist Mary Yost (@maryyost) has been named Editor of the trade magazine (@columbusceomag).

Coloradoan The Coloradoan (Fort Collins, CO): Lauren Gustus (@laurengustus) is the new Executive Editor of the Fort Collins daily paper (@coloradoan), replacing Josh Awtry. She was most recently with the Reno Gazette-Journal as an Editor.

MEDIAware’s full weekly version can be found at:www.prnewswire.com/knowledge-center/medi…

PR Newswire’s Audience Research Department provides daily updates on Twitter (twitter.com/PRNmedia).

Detailed outlet and contact information is available at Agility (agility.prnewswire.com).

Blogging Basics from Big Time Bloggers

The New York Women in Communications Foundation’s 2013 Student Communications Career Conference (#SCC13) was held earlier this month. The conference consisted of different breakout sessions relating to media and communications. One of the sessions I attended was about blogging. The panel was moderated by Lori Greene, digital content innovator/blogger. The panelists were:

Q: How do you know when your blog has hit and made a difference?

Morris: I knew it hit when it was being supported by the beauty industry. I specifically mean the brands that I write about, the publicists for the brands, and other writers in the industry. I also started getting real traffic to my blog.

Q: How do you get to those big traffic numbers on your blog?

Heitlinger: At some point I learned about Google Analytics and copied that code into my HTML. I spent a few hours every couple days digging in, learning and tracking things. I started seeing what time of day most people were reading; where in the country/world people were reading from; where they would click after coming to the homepage, etc. This information will really tell you a lot about your readers. And Google Analytics has improved a great deal since I started using it.

Dooling: When you’re first starting out, you need to really think about where you want to blog. If you want to have your own domain or be part of someone else’s that has a larger following. Also, you need to figure out who you want to work with.

Q: Elizabeth, how do you go about hiring bloggers? What do you find works? What’s the best way to pitch to be posted on a professional blog like Huffington Post?

Perle: For my section, anyone can blog. There are very few instances where we will say no to a writer (if it’s an offensive post). I actually think that our most effective posts aren’t the kids who are the best writers, but it’s about the strongest narratives. Readers can smell from a mile away if you’re being unauthentic. Also a lot of our best bloggers enjoy drawing infographics — there are many different ways to tell the narrative. Another important thing is being an active member of the blogger community.

Q: How do you make a living from blogging?

Morris: Making money changes by the month and even year. Sometimes I can find consistent work for three or six months at a time. The main way I make money now is through partnerships with brands, such as beauty, health and fitness brands – because that is what I really know. When you start a blog, you want to pick something you want to become an expert in and have a passion for.

Q: How do you keep your credibility to your followers when working with brands?

Morris: As an online blogger, I am always able to say when something is sponsored or when I am being compensated. I have picked everything I do that is sponsored very strategically. The power of no is bigger than the power of yes. I can’t tell you how many things, regardless of how much money it is, that I have turned down because it doesn’t represent me or my brand. The best advice I can give when starting a blog is to always put your audience first. It is not about you but it is about your audience.

Dooling: When I started blogging there were no guidelines about what you could and couldn’t say. Now the FTC does regulate what you do as a blogger. You need to have it listed on your post and About page if something is sponsored, and you need to list out any large partnerships that you have. There are many different ways to make money from a blog. I think freelance writing is probably what most bloggers do, because you’re already writing anyway. You can also do sponsored posts or banner ads for money. You can do this by putting on your About page that you are accepting banner ads. Another thing is to have your own following. There are many communities out there who are doing what you’re doing and you need to follow them.

Heitlinger: What I think is really important is having multiple streams of cash flow. For me, freelance writing did not work out, but being paid to come speak at places or hosting events is a great income. This is in addition to the sponsored content, banner ads, etc., on my blog. And the bigger your audience, the more you can ask for. You have a lot more power to say no to offers when you receive 30 requests a day for sponsored content and you’re only accepting 2-3 a month. You have that flexibility and freedom when you build that audience. However, when you start receiving income as a blogger, you should think about whether that is something you want to do full-time. You have to realize that you are taking your hobby and passion and associating a value with it, because once you start taking money it becomes a job. Knowing that you truly love what you’re doing and who you’re partnering with is much more important than the money at the end of the day.

Perle: If you’re going to blog for free, be strategic about it. Ask questions like, “Do I retain the rights to my own work?” Also, if you volunteer your time for free to write something for a publication, pick one that you want to work for.

Q: How often should you be blogging?

Heitlinger: I think it is a very personal decision, but I think they key is consistency. This doesn’t necessarily mean extremely high frequency, but it may mean that you write a killer blog post every Sunday night that goes up on your blog.

Dooling: Don’t put yourself in a position where you have to write something, because readers can smell that inauthenticity from a mile away. Figuring out when you have the time to put something up, goes very far.

Morris: Don’t make it into a chore, but always keep it as a passion. Your readers are coming to you because you are a source, so you have to be a source of credible information. You never want to post something to post it.

Q: If someone is starting their own blog, how much money should they be spending to start it?

Heitlinger: You should spend $0 starting your blog. Maybe buy the domain for $10, but if it is anything more than that, then find a new domain. The best thing you can do as a blogger is to spend as much time as possible building content, and then you can start to think about whether this is something you want to continue doing long term and if it will go somewhere. After all this, you can think about investing money.

Dooling: The best thing someone ever told me is that blogging is the great equalizer. Your dad doesn’t need to be a marketing executive to become a great blogger.

Q: How do you evolve your blog as something more professional?

Morris: You should crosslink with bigger blogs. You also need to really put yourself out there. So if your blog is fitness-related then a blog like Fitness.com might like something like that. Reach out to them by putting something on their Facebook page or tweeting them. Don’t be scared.

Q: If you want to publish original content and clips of content from another publication on your blog, do you need two separate blogs?

Dooling: I put my older clips on my personal blog. I differentiate them by adding an editor’s note at the top that says, “This was originally posted on [publication name] on [date of publication].” Or sometimes I will embed the image of the logo of where it was featured.

Written by Polina Opelbaum, editor of ProfNet, a service that helps journalists connect with expert sources. To read more from Polina, check out her blog on ProfNet Connect.

Media Databases: A Valuable Research Tool in the Right Hands

Media ResearchA good tool can only live up to its potential with the skill of a good craftsman. The carpenter’s motto of measuring twice and cutting once makes that point clearly. If a cut is made in the wrong place it doesn’t matter how many features the saw had.

Many years ago, when I first started with PR Newswire, I worked in the media research department. We contacted journalists in particular regions and industries to collect or verify their information, including what beats they covered and how they preferred to be contacted, for better targeting from our media database.

We spent a lot of time on the phone asking questions and explaining the importance of having the details correct so that mismatched pitches could be avoided.

I was rather passionate about PR Newswire’s database being an accurate targeting tool: a sharp and precise implement.

One day I was forwarded a call from an editor at a major publication who was upset because a PR person had called her with information about something that was of no interest to her and when she inquired where the person had gotten her phone number they directed her to us.

“I want to be removed from your database,” she said emphatically, explaining that she only takes pitches via email. Unsolicited phone calls were very distracting to her.

I sincerely apologized if information we had shared with our clients had been incorrect and led to an unwanted phone call. “I’ll gladly remove you completely from our database,” I said. But then I explained to her what I have explained so many times, “Removing your details may cause more unwelcome phone calls than it resolves. People can still find your contact information on your website and will make their own assumptions about how you want to be contacted.”

I looked up her information and found that actually we had her record correct. Quite possibly the person who had called her didn’t read all the information. It clearly stated she preferred to be contacted via email.

“My suggestion is that together we craft a very detailed pitch-note for your record,” I said.

She agreed and we came up with something that explained not only her dislike for unsolicited phone calls, but we also wrote something very specific about what she did want to hear about, because in the end she said she didn’t want all PR contacts to stop. She wanted better targeted pitches.

She and I were of the same mind and I continue to advocate for journalists to contribute to media databases, and to educate communicators on how to use media databases well.

A good PR professional will have a clear understanding of who they are reaching out to before an email is written or a phone number is dialed. That is how it should work and I think there are a lot of good PR people out there who do just that. They’re the successful ones who actually build relationships with the media.

Unfortunately people don’t always use their tools correctly. They don’t always measure twice before emailing.

How can you use a media database effectively and wisely?

  1. Know your audience before you start. Do some research and have an understanding of who you are trying to reach. Everyone wants to see their news in The Wall Street Journal , but will your audience be looking for your information there, or are you more likely to find your audience via a regional trade publication?
  2. Be creative with your searches. A good database will give you a variety of ways to search for outlets and contacts by name, subject/beat, region, circulation, etc. Do multiple searches and don’t select too many parameters in one search or you’re likely to have limited results.
  3. Try a keyword search combined with a region or industry. Just like any search engine, your results are only as good as your search terms.
  4. Refine your list. Don’t ever pitch everyone that came up in a search result. Good targeting, which results in media pickup requires careful screening. Start by scanning the publication names and subjects that came up. Remove contacts that are obviously not a fit. The keyword ‘cable’ might be in someone’s profile, but if it’s referring to television and your information is about a steel product, then that contact is not going to do you any good and you’ll be wasting their time. Continue scanning the data and removing contacts as needed.
  5. READ. There is no shortcut to understanding what a journalist or blogger writes about. Read their work to understand their focus and style. They may write about the industry you are targeting but perhaps it’s a blog that pokes fun at industry mishaps.
  6. Connect socially. A good database will provide links to a journalist or blogger’s Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ accounts. Follow journalists and bloggers that seem to be a fit and pay attention to what they are talking about and what they are interested in. What is it that currently holds their attention? Engage appropriately with thoughtful comments or by reposting/retweeting their work.
  7. Understand the pitch-notes. Before sending an email or picking up the phone to call anyone on your list, arm yourself with the information in the pitch-notes and be mindful of any special instructions or requests.

PR professionals should look to help journalists and bloggers by being a useful source of relevant content that is wisely pitched after careful research. Bonus points are earned if you are helpful beyond your own pitches.

Like those many years ago working in media research, I’m still passionate about helping journalists, bloggers and PR professionals make good matches. However it does take both sides working together: the journalist or blogger making their preferences known and for PRs to do the research necessary to make sure their story is reaching the people who want to hear about it. Working together we are all more efficient.

Victoria HarresVictoria Harres is VP, Audience Development & Social Media at PR Newswire and the original voice behind @PRNewswire. She speaks and writes about social media, PR and marketing. 

PR Trends for 2014: Focused Content & Multiple Formats Appeal to Niche Audiences

pr trends 14It’s that time of year when we start to reflect upon the past and consider the future, and take stock of our personal skills and development. The significant changes in the digital media environment that are so instrumental in shaping public opinion today require us, as communicators, to continually update and refresh our strategies and tactics.

Here some PR trends we’re seeing for the coming year.

Niche amplification: As of this writing, Google’s revenues are greater than the US newspaper and magazine markets – combined – and their business is built on delivering niche information.   And social signals play an important role in how Google (and other search engines) categorize information – in fact, according to the latest data I could find, eight of the top ten factors Google uses to index information are derived from social interaction.

All that orange at the top of the graph signifies the role social media play in informing search results.

What does all this mean?  Simply put, it means that digital audiences are drivers of message visibility, and generating interaction around messages – likes, shares, tweets, pins and clicks on links – are crucial components of digital visibility today. lil tweet

To generate the authentic sort of interest among audiences who care, communicators are driving deep into niche interests.  They’re not targeting the top 100 food bloggers, for example, for a pitch about gluten-free ingredients.  Instead, they’re drilling into the gluten-free community, identifying and connecting with active and well-connected members of that group. Additionally, communicators are doing something else.  They are crafting increasingly ….

Focused content designed to engage audiences, not just media and influencers:  From Google’s emphasis on conversational search to the strength of niche magazine sales, one thing is clear: tightly focused content is eagerly consumed by audiences, especially when it offers unique insight or real utility.

What does this mean for PR pros?  Audiences are telling us what they’re interested in and what they value, and this intelligence creates an important contextual framework for a variety of communications, from the pitch to the press release.

new school banner

This means framing messaging in the context of the audiences’ interest, in the form of answers to their questions, solutions to their problems and advice that ultimately makes their lives better – whether it makes a job easier, a hobby more fulfilling or a cause more compelling.   This trend – the development of more focused content, is also having an impact more broadly as …

PR teams are publishers & creators of more owned content:  One could argue that the definition of newsworthiness has changed, as media outlets are changing up their model and chasing the digital golden rings – namely, larger audiences and more web site traffic.    In addition to emphasizing stories designed to grab public attention (such as CNN’s spectacularly comprehensive coverage of Miley Cyrus’ performance at the Video Music Awards), journalists and bloggers are actively curating content on social networks, working to bolster their own social media presences, as well as those of the outlets they represent.   As a result, the digital news hole is huge, and outlets are very willing to reference owned content, including market research or user surveys.   A few years, ago, a PR team probably would not have dreamed of pitching these kinds of content, but in reality, company data can offer insight and provide significant story opportunities.   Savvy PR teams can work with their marketing counterparts to acquire rich visuals they can repurpose to add richness to a pitch, and they also know content that may not make the cut for a column or show can still gain exposure if an influencer shares it with his or her followers.  To maximize a message’s potential; communicators are grasping another trend, which is …

Employing multiple message formats & content distribution channels: It’s a rare campaign that doesn’t have multiple news hooks or angles, and it’s a rare audience that is found in just one place.   To ensure maximum uptake of a message, public relations professionals are increasingly employing a variety of message formats, and they’re deploying this content across multiple channels.  Done well, this approach does two things – it acquires new audiences for the organization, and encourages deeper engagement from the audience.   Delivering content across multiple channels is a sure-fire way to bring messages to new audiences, as long as the communicators behind the message are sure to synch the content with each audience. And employing a variety of formats – short form video, long form text, illustrative infographics, snackable posts and pithy tweets – ensures that people will find content in the format that is most appealing to them – which is the first step in building engagement.

Measurement of outcomes not outputs It wouldn’t be a PR trends report without a reference to measurement, but this year, there’s a twist.  Marketers are growing more and more adept at measuring campaigns, channels, messages and outcomes, and that’s increasing the pressure on PR to tighten the screws on the key performance indicators we use to describe our work.   The nails are in the coffins of the equivalency metrics (such as ad value equivalencies, or worse, ad cost equivalencies) as communicators are learning to correlate message outcomes and interactions across channels, and are developing the ability to connect message reads and interactions directly with the marketing funnel and lead-generation databases within the organization.

PR is a bigger job than ever before, and the profession is growing in rigor.   What’s on your radar screen as you head into 2014?

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the newly-published ebook  Driving Content DiscoveryFollow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

8 Blogger Relations Tips from a Blogger

Photo by Jhayne/flickr, used under Creative Commons license

Photo by Jhayne/flickr, used under Creative Commons license

I dread checking my email sometimes. Outside of my job as a media relations manager at PR Newswire, I’m a local interest blogger. Like most bloggers, my inbox fills up with its fair share of pitches.

Some pitches are fantastic: To the point, clearly familiar with my blog, pitching me something my readers and I care about. Others, not so much.

I read every single one of them, though; all the way through. Even the ones addressed to “Andrea”.

The only reason I don’t hit delete on the bad pitches is because I want to learn from their mistakes. I look at what makes me happy as a blogger, as well as what doesn’t. Then I think about how I can incorporate that into my own blogger outreach.

Here are a few lessons I learned:

1) Start your research on the blogger’s About, Disclosure, and PR pages. These pages are a quick way to discover what the blog is about, whether the blogger accepts pitches, and how to reach them. Many of them also have guidelines on the topics they do and don’t blog about.

2) Then do even more research. In addition to looking at the About page, read blog posts. Dig back a month or so. If the blogger doesn’t write about your topic, post giveaways, or review products, your time is better spent pitching someone who does. Check out their blogroll for ideas on other bloggers you can reach out to.

3) Build the relationship before you pitch. Some pitches have caught my attention solely because I recognized the person’s name. That’s because the pitcher had previously reached out to me either by email or with a comment on my blog.

Next time you’re interested in pitching a blogger, try reading their blog and leaving a comment – not as the brand you represent, but as yourself (no pitching in this initial outreach).  A pitch later on may be more likely to catch a blogger’s attention if they recognize your name. Plus, when your pitch says you enjoy reading my blog, I know you’re being honest.

4) Provide advance notice. If you’re pitching an event or have a specific timeline for when you need coverage, don’t wait until the week of. Many bloggers plan their posts in advance. A blogger may make an exception if they have a previous relationship with you (see tip 3), or it’s such an incredible opportunity from a major player in their niche.

However, there is not always time to squeeze in a last minute post. Even if you don’t have all of the details ready for a blog post, pitch the basics with a heads up of when you’re looking for a post. Then ask if the blogger would like the rest of the specifics once they’re finalized.

5) Be clear, but realistic in your ask. If you expect a certain level of commitment from a blogger, communicate that in your conversation, but plan some flexibility to accommodate different bloggers’ availability. For instance, I may not be able to schedule two posts, but I could commit to one post and more social media pushes.

Consider the blogger’s short and long-term value and then decide what you’re ok with in return for the compensation you’re offering.

6) Think beyond the blogger. Know the blog’s audience. Always consider who will be reading a blog post and be careful about overlapping audiences. Don’t oversaturate a particular niche all at once.

Try identifying bloggers from a few different niches that are relevant to your pitch. For instance, a store opening could be pitched to fashion bloggers, local event blogs, lifestyle/personal bloggers, and mom or dad bloggers. Just remember to tailor the angle of your pitch to each individual’s interests. While there may be some overlap, each niche has its own unique audience.

Or spread your campaign over a longer period of time. After you determine the influence level of your target blogs, reach out to a group of high-value influencers, then stagger your outreach to your second and third groups.

Remember that the value of a blogger is not just how large their audience is, but also the relevancy to your brand and how likely it is that they’ll blog about you. A blogger with a smaller audience who is passionate about your brand may be better than a blogger with a massive audience who is not quite the right fit.

7) Be prepared. Be helpful. Short and sweet pitches are fantastic. However, after the pitch, the more resources you have prepared, the better.

When it comes to multimedia, think beyond your brand’s logo; have product shots, event photos, relevant infographics, or embeddable video ready. Similarly, be prepared with hashtags, social media handles, examples of tweets and other social media messaging. Don’t attach everything to your pitch, but offer its availability.

8) The relationship doesn’t stop at the blog post. How a brand interacts after the blog post could help or hurt future outreach just as much as the initial pitch does. A short email thanking the blogger is nice, as is sharing their post (and other posts) on your social media channels.

You don’t need to overwhelm bloggers with a lot of attention; however, the occasional retweet from a brand has helped keep them on my mind months after I blogged about them. Conversely, I try to extend the same courtesy by thanking the brand rep or retweeting their content.

Bonus: An example of good blogger relations.

There are a lot of bad pitches shared online. Instead, here’s an example of blogger relations that left this blogger smiling:

The Katz Club Diner recently opened in Cleveland and is in the process of developing a local coffee program. To build awareness, Emily Richardson of The Katz Club decided to host a blogger meet-up.

Although she had a few dates in mind for a coffee-tasting, her initial pitch was a simple introduction asking bloggers for feedback on what time of day was most convenient to them.

What she learned is that many bloggers were unavailable at a time the restaurant had been considering. Instead of planning an event and then learning no one could attend, Richardson maximized event attendance by engaging with influencers.

By seeking input, being flexible, and giving plenty of advance notice, she demonstrated The Katz Club Diner was honestly interested in what bloggers thought and wanted to work with them.

They were dedicated to building a relationship, which is at the core of all media relations. In turn, I want to build one with them.

Want to improve your pitching?  Hone your pitches and streamline your workflow with Agility, the PR Newswire platform that enables you to target and engage with journalists and bloggers. 

Amanda Hicken is a media relations manager at PR Newswire. You can find her online @ADHicken.

Pitching the Media: It’s not what it used to be

Life was so simple back when I was a reporter all those years ago. A pen, pad and a mic were all I needed to report the news of the day.

There were really only two ways someone could pitch a story idea to me for the television station I worked for.

Calling the newsroom was by far the most popular pitching method. My assignment editor was the gatekeeper of all incoming calls.  Amazing guy. He could juggle the phone lines, monitor the police scanner and fax machine all to the steady hum of news alerts spewing from the AP printer in the background. You had to get pass him before you could get to me.

If you couldn’t get through by phone, PR folks simply dropped their release in the mail.  That’s right, good ole snail mail!  A batch of releases and letters were neatly stacked on a designated corner of my assignment editor’s desk waiting to be weeded through daily.

It’s a lot different today. We have email and social media to thank for that. PR folks have a multitude of new tools they can now use to deliver their message to the media.

But some pitching rules hold fast.

“Know what the reporter is looking for,” says JJ Ramberg, host of MSNBC’s Your Business. This is #1 on every journalist’s list I’ve come across as a media relations manager with PR Newswire so let’s start there.

  • Do your research: A journalists can tell right away how much you know about their publication or show. JJ says the tip off for her is when people pitch companies.

“We don’t profile companies or people. We feature lessons in small business. That’s what PR folks should pitch to my show.”  Make a good first impression by learning what the media point specifically covers; who their audience is and the various platforms they report on.

  • Personalize your pitch:  A canned pitch is not an effective pitch. Target your pitch to appeal to the media org’s readers/viewers. Be flexible and willing to change your strategy to fit the needs of the publication you’re pitching. Your objective may be to get coverage of an event, but the publication may be interested in another angle of the story. Be open to switching it up to accommodate the journalist.
  • Keep it simple:  Stay away from industry jargon.  “Journalists are not venture capitalists. Our eyes roll when we hear words like “synergy” or “next-generation” or other management-speak buzzwords,” says Colleen DeBaise, former special projects director of Entrepreneur.com and current digital media director at The Story Exchange.  Colorful words don’t make the story more attractive. In fact, it can be a total turn-off.
  • Be available:  Remember, you are on their time. Though you may not grab their attention at first, they may need you later down the road. And when that happens,  be ready.  When they call, answer. Whatever they need, get it. Believe me, they will be forever grateful that you helped them out at crunch time.

The art of pitching the media is forever evolving and changing depending on the nature of your story and the type of media you’re pitching. This Wednesday, I will be moderating a “Pitch the Media Live” panel at the Woman Entrepreneurs Conference in NY. Attendees will have the opportunity to pitch a panel of journalists on the spot and get their honest feedback.  Here are the conference details, agenda and the place you can register.

Work smarter!  Hone your pitches and streamline your workflow with Agility, the PR Newswire platform that enables you to target, monitor and engage with traditional and social media, all in one place.

Author Brett Savage-Simon is a senior manager of media relations for PR Newswire. 

Your Content Needs a Downstream Strategy

Brian Clark of Copyblogger at #CMWorld

Brian Clark of Copyblogger at #CMWorld

I’m up early, noodling on the input from day one of Content Marketing World, and just realized the great advice I heard yesterday all has a common theme, and it’s this:  content needs a downstream strategy.

Over the years we’ve heard a lot about planning editorial calendars, developing buyer personas, doing keyword research and plumbing social conversations for insights that together will help you create and publish amazing content your audience will love. However, almost all the speakers yesterday talked in some form about what happens post-publication.  Or, more specifically, what needs to happen.

Promote your content.  Both Jay Baer and Todd Wheatland emphasized the importance of supporting your own content, and they weren’t talking about just posting a few tweets.   Wheatland noted that most viral videos were boosted at some point with paid promotion.  And Baer went further, noting that advertising isn’t the content marketer’s competition – it’s an enabler that drives qualified views.  Advertising campaigns and PR can fuel significant visibility for the content your brand produces, and in addition to exposure to the audience, they can generate media along the way, which will launch your content into a different stratosphere.

Own the authorship. Copyblogger’s Brian Clark made no bones about the fact that authorship is becoming increasingly important, both in Google’s eyes and  in affecting individual decisions about consuming content.  Rel=author and rel=publisher tags, which essentially authenticate the source of the content by creating a linkage between the content and either a person’s or a brand’s Google+ page, will play an increasingly important role in surfacing content, as Google de-emphasizes anonymous content.   And according to Clark, authorship is something we need to be paying attention to when writing articles or guest posts.  “Who gets the canonical link is a negotiating point,” he noted in his session.

What’s the driver behind this new focus on content post-publication? Without a doubt it’s the finite amount of audience attention, and the spectacular amount of content every marketer is competing with today.  As Baer noted in his presentation, we’re competing for that attention with our audiences spouses, friends and family — not to mention cute baby animal videos — within Facebook news feeds, on Twitter and in almost every other social network.  The simple act of publishing great content is no guarantee of success.  To win qualified attention, content needs support, promotion and a badge of authenticity. In short, we need to build downstream strategies into our content planning.

Driving Content Discovery: TODAY at Content Marketing World – 10:45 a.m., Ballroom C 

We heard Jay Baer say “Market your marketing.” Today at Content Marketing World I’ll be talking about  exactly that,  in a session titled “10 Online Discovery Tips that Will Get Your Content Promoted.”   It’s scheduled for 10:45 and will be in Ballroom C.   I’ll be offering 19 (instead of the previously advertised 10) ways to build an element of discovery into your content strategy, and to promote the discovery of the information your brand publishes.  Hope to see you there! 

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of the e-books Unlocking Social Media for PR and the newly-published  New School Press Release Tactics.  Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.