Tag Archives: Visual PR

Content We Love: Uncovering gDiapers

ContentWeLove

“Content We Love” is a weekly feature written by a team of our content specialists. We’re showcasing some of the great content distributed through our channels, and our content specialists are up for the task: they spend a lot of time with the press releases and other content our customers create, proof reading and formatting it, suggesting targeted distribution strategy and offering content optimization advice. In Content We Love, we’re going to shine the spotlight on the press releases and other messages that stood out to us, and we’ll tell you why. We hope you find the releases enjoyable and the insights gained from discussing them enlightening.

On the cusp of NYFW, the rattlers were sounded when gDiapers released their version of the Fall trends– for babies!

gDiapers Introduces Mix-And-Match Coordinates And Diaper Covers For Fall 2013

The headline, complete with an action verb, covers more than fashion.

The priority with a headline is that it IS the first glimpse of a story. It needs to tell the full story in ideally 65 characters with spaces. Reason being: search engines index the first 65 characters. There isn’t a penalty for going over; simply keep the story in the beginning!

gDiapers’ headline showcases a new product which highlights the prettier side of diapers: fashion! The company makes diapers more eco-friendly by having flushable (or compost-able) inserts in festive covers.

gDiapers: A company dedicated to eliminating conventional disposable diapers from the planet. The new gVeggie gPant pictured here with coordinating gLegs.  (PRNewsFoto/gDiapers)

When introducing a new product, it is paramount to include an image. Images increase your chance of visibility which means more eyes will be potentially seeing your image! Scrolling through releases and seeing an adorable baby wearing a colorful diaper? Yeah. I clicked on that to see the story. gDiapers? #Winning.

Great headlines and powerful imagery deliver directly to readers (like a stork) and just like new baby smell, we can’t help but love it!

Big thanks to gDiapers for bringing beauty to dirty diapers everywhere.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/gdiapers-introduces-mix-and-match-coordinates-and-diaper-covers-for-fall-2013-225097352.html

Author Emily Nelson is a Customer Content Specialist for PR Newswire. Follow her adventures on www.bellesandawhistle.wordpress.com or on twitter www.twitter.com/emilyannnelson.

Your Audience Knows Best: Content Format

A conversation I had yesterday with a PR textbook author got me thinking about our habits and the tactics we employ to communicate with our audiences. We were talking about digital storytelling, and the conversation turned to multimedia.

What format should a multimedia press release take, he asked.   I think my answer may have surprised him — and wrecked his chapter outline, to boot.

The format of the content shouldn’t dictate the message.

My answer veered off the path of what I think he expected, because I said that the answer to that question depends upon the audience, and is informed by the assets you have at hand.

You won’t go wrong if  you start with your audience.  Where do they look for information?  Do they gravitate toward a particular social network or digital community?  If so, what sort of content does that audience prefer?   Asking these questions and allowing the answers to inform your content strategy will ensure more effective communications.

Some networks, like Instagram and Pinterest, are built on visuals.  However, visuals are also make messages more effective on networks like Twitter and Facebook. And they carry extra weight with search engines — and speaking of search engines, YouTube is the second largest.  Point is, incorporating visual elements – video, images, downloadable content such as presentation decks or white papers — will ensure your message is available to the denizens of those networks.  Making visual communications a habit will improve communications results.

I don’t like thinking in terms of formats, simply because they discourage people from incorporating multimedia elements if they perceive they don’t have all of the right content lined up.    Instead, allow your audience’s needs to guide development of your content. 

Author Sarah Skerik is PR Newswire’s vice president of content marketing, and is the author of  the newly-published ebooks  New School Press Release Tactics and Driving Content Discovery. Follow her on Twitter at @sarahskerik.

Content We Love: Storytelling – Indy Style

ContentWeLove“Content We Love” is a weekly feature written by a team of our content specialists. We’re showcasing some of the great content distributed through our channels, and our content specialists are up for the task: they spend a lot of time with the press releases and other content our customers create, proof reading and formatting it, suggesting targeted distribution strategy and offering content optimization advice. In Content We Love, we’re going to shine the spotlight on the press releases and other messages that stood out to us, and we’ll tell you why. We hope you find the releases enjoyable and the insights gained from discussing them enlightening.

From bedtime stories to blockbuster hits– a good story captivates an audience. Press releases are the vehicle to tell a story and when a daughter’s tale of taking her dad’s music from the charts to the stage crossed my view, I couldn’t help but be impressed by the story and the visuals. Really impressed.

THE STORY: Storytelling is the backbone of sending a press release. While it is important to have the language professional, it is being sent and read by people. Search engines responded appropriately and SEO scores now factor in the readibility of a press release. Does it read like spam? Does it read like a person wrote it? In this case, the human element is alive and well throughout this press release. Remember the phrase, “it’s not what you say but how you say it”?

This is imperative for press releases because they need to deliver information,  but they   must also read well. While there is no magic formula for which words to use, keep the audience in mind. And just like this release about a “little love story about selling dreams and making them come true,” you’ll find your audience hanging on each word.

THE MULTIMEDIA: From the background to the video to the great ad (for a musical about an ad-man, how fitting!), the visual elements jumped from the page and we did more than take notice. The video was played, the graphics were admired, and the background received more compliments for framing the story than I would’ve expected.

While the featured video is not a highly produced feature film, the resounding response loved it because it was personal, and it fits well with the nature of the announcement. The musical was accepted into The New York International Fringe Festival and the video highlights the team’s excitement at this news. This translates loud and clear.

Our statistics show including multimedia assets increase your visibility because people are naturally drawn to images! Including a compelling image on a release is perfect harmony.

Congratulations and thank you to the  Someone To Belong To team. We can’t wait for the tour so we can see the show.

http://www.multivu.com/mnr/61772-someone-to-belong-to-denoon-the-new-york-international-fringe-festival

Author Emily Nelson is a Customer Content Specialist for PR Newswire. Follow her adventures on www.bellesandawhistle.wordpress.com or on twitter www.twitter.com/emilyannnelson.

Content We Love: Buzz Worthy Content

ContentWeLove“Content We Love” is a weekly feature written by a team of our content specialists. We’re showcasing some of the great content distributed through our channels, and our content specialists are up for the task: they spend a lot of time with the press releases and other content our customers create, proof reading and formatting it, suggesting targeted distribution strategy and offering content optimization advice. In Content We Love, we’re going to shine the spotlight on the press releases and other messages that stood out to us, and we’ll tell you why. We hope you find the releases enjoyable and the insights gained from discussing them enlightening.

Whole Foods Market University Heights' produce department with and without items dependent on pollinator populations. (PRNewsFoto/Whole Foods Market)

Whole Foods Market University Heights’ produce department with and without items dependent on pollinator populations. (PRNewsFoto/Whole Foods Market)

Action is the ultimate impact of news. Buzzwords of “viral” become the goal that one message, one story will have the strength to not only impact the audience, but cause them to take action.

When I first saw Whole Foods Market’s release showcasing what a grocery store would look like without bees, I was captivated by the image of a grocery store with and without the handiwork of bees.

Our studies show adding a visual increases your visibility and it isn’t because we just like pretty pictures– audiences globally are inherently interested in images. So what better what to showcase up your story!

After the story was released, Huffington Post picked it up, showcased the image front and center and even tweeted about it. This spun retweets, more repostings and even a petition to protect the bees.

From a story with a photo, to message boards and social media globally, this release shows adding an image = buzz.

Big thanks to Whole Foods Market for a BEE-utiful press release.

http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/this-is-what-your-grocery-store-looks-like-without-bees-211164141.html

Author Emily Nelson is a Customer Content Specialist for PR Newswire. Follow her adventures on www.bellesandawhistle.wordpress.com or on twitter www.twitter.com/emilyannnelson.